Article: T. West contemporary approach to preservation

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DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: T. West contemporary approach to preservation

Post by DavidC »


Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Cool to read about the possibility of re-canvasing the roof.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

When I first saw T-West, they had just installed a new, white product by 3M that made the interiors much brighter, and not one whit better. Olga liked it. Seeing the Garden Room and Studio with the soft hue of canvas again would be a treat.

Rood
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Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Tom wrote:Cool to read about the possibility of re-canvasing the roof.
Good luck with that. Having witnessed what happened to the draughting room canvas roof on rainy or windy days ... you would not want to be there for a repeat ... you certainly would not wish to try to work under those conditions.

High wind caused each section of canvas to rock up and down with such force and with such thunderous sounds that your mind eventually goes blank. Telephone calls go unanswered, because nothing can be heard but WHOOP, WHOOP, WHOOP.

When things finally settle down, and it rains ... water collects in the middle of each stressed canvas, forming a formidable bulge that threatens to break The only way to get rid of the water is to puncture the canvas with a nail to let the water drain into buckets.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

A series of cables stretched parallel to the length of the drafting room, supporting the panels of canvas, would at least prevent water from collecting in a single "basin" at the (downhill) center of the panel ?

I suppose that Mr Wright considered that the pitch of the roof would prevent the pooling that Rood describes . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

A roof consisting exclusively of canvas panels would be ludicrous to reconstruct. Panels of some transparent/translucent material of substantial structure with canvas lining the inside would work. Even more important for the look of authenticity would be to arrange the interior furniture and furnishings to replicate the look of the drafting room as it was 80 years ago. When I was last at them, both T-West and Taliesin drafting rooms were a sloppy mess.

SDR
Posts: 18683
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

A working room versus a Great Workroom ?

The essence and meaning of the canvas is its translucency---an "agreeable diffusion of light within. . .so enjoyable and sympathetic to the desert" as Mr Wright put it.

S

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