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Avery Coonley's grandson
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1997
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

By "bones showing" I think you have in mind the interiors of the
Haystack buildings - no?

The interior of my friends residence is all painted sheetrock.
The sloped ceilings are stained wood.
The house was completed in the early 70's.

(Haystack is an all time fave)
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14297
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. But the sheds at Haystack aren't intended for year-round use, so they don't have to be insulated, which gives the designer the pleasure of revealing the structure in a simple and straightforward way. One thinks of Mies, and the desire to show the bones of a steel skyscraper. Fireproofing insulation defeats that one. An elusive goal is the revelation of what it is we're standing inside of, and under ?

It is this that Mr Wright had little affection for, apparently. He was after something other than constructivist "honesty"; his was a different architectural ideal, the making of space with material surfaces which suggest their material reality, independent of their structural role. Or, to be more precise, he seemed to value the supportive role of the masonry mass, clearly revealed; it was the infill of wood, plaster, and "stuff" which he manipulated cleverly so that its structural realities were concealed -- irrelevant, beneath discussion ? -- and its surface realities fully in evidence. In the earlier work, trim might be applied as poetic reference to the stud wall or raftered roof beneath the surface; one of the many advances which the later work exhibits is the falling away of these references, and the use of every visible piece of material, save perhaps perfs and decorative fascia elements, to achieve both function and visual delight.

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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1997
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have a link to the Texas houses that you have in mind?
I presume they are year 'round?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it might have been Lake Flato -- here's a place-holder:

https://www.designboom.com/architecture/lake-flato-hillside-house-austin-texas-07-01-2016/
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14297
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a more interesting design by the same architects; it's widely visible on the Internet. Here's an informative page:

https://architizer.com/projects/hog-pen-creek-residence/
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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2202
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom wrote:
In the 1908 photographs of this house the little girl next to the tree and at the point of the terrace just above the water is this guys Mom. .......

I own one the original period prints made from the negative. It is inspiring and says a lot about great architecture and the amazing clients that make great buildings possible. It has to be one of the most famous architectural photographs of all time. At some point in it will be gifted to the Art Institute of Chicago by my estate.
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1997
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What are the dimensions of that print?
Is it the one where she is next to the tree or the one where she is on the prow of the terrace?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm guessing that would be a print from a glass plate ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photographic_plate

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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2202
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

8 x 10. She is looking down into the water.

The negative was likely glass. The tonality of the black and level of detail is amazing. It is amazing.
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1997
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh! - you've got the best one!
Yes, the Getty Image of this is incredible.
The plane of reflections and the light on the building
-really great.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And . . . who took the photo ? Did Mr Wright have a large-format camera ?

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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7483

PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Considering that FLW had the daughter "whited out" on the photo by the tree, I suspect he did not have anything to do with the original photography.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14297
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reet. The Getty should have the photographer's name. I suspect it might be Henry Fuermann and Sons and/or the Chicago Architectural Photographing Company, suggested by a note at the back of Manson's book, which reproduces the companion photo with the child bending over the pool.

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewtopic.php?p=59613

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