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Kentuck Knob Dining Room Table
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Mod mom



Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 383

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:26 am    Post subject: Kentuck Knob Dining Room Table Reply with quote

Part of Mr Wright's genius was in the functionality of space. I absolutely love how the Kentucky Knob dining room table can be broken into smaller functioning pieces:

http://old.post-gazette.com/images2/20010623smWright5.jpg

My daughter is a third year architecture student and her final project for studio this semester is re-designing our 1962 tower by van Fossen into a B&B/artist retreat.(the condition was so bad that after taking ownership, we had it gutted, black mold remediated and currently it is secured for phase 2) Each of the 4 floors is ~ 370 sq ft. The lowest level will be a library/artist work room, entry level floor will be a small kitchenette/living room, the next floor will be a bedroom/bathroom and the 4th will remain a roof terrace. We had no "as built" drawings, so she produced as built plans and made both a cad and 3d model.

Using Mr. Wright's idea of a table that breaks into several pieces will help us conserve space. Eventually I want a similar approach for our main dining room table in the main house as well. Genius!


Last edited by Mod mom on Sat Apr 29, 2017 4:39 pm; edited 2 times in total
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are other Usonian examples, including the Goetsch-Winckler house:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwj3y7bxi8rTAhVE04MKHeDGCYQQjRwIBw&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.savewright.org%2Fcase-study%2Fquick-action-saves-goetsch-winckler-house%2F&psig=AFQjCNFsrs8UcrGiInL9Jzk3Ejls6yCDQQ&ust=1493569951984759

Here the table sections are about the size of a sofa end-table -- but at the height of a dining table. They are not attached to each other with latches of any sort; note the out-of-level meeting between the segments. Other photos show them rocking-and-rolling like little ships at sea . . .

I wonder what taking apart a long table into two pieces will accomplish. The same bulk still exists; now a dedicated spot has to be found for the second half when it is moved away from the dining space. If it is used as a desk or work table elsewhere in the apartment, it will have to be cleared whenever needed, and moved (by two people, unless on a smooth floor that won't be damaged by dragging), leaving an unusable spot in the room.

The only way to truly create space, as I see it, would be to have a table which would collapse or fold easily, to minimize its bulk. Perhaps you've thought of these matters and solved them to your satisfaction ?

SDR
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2006
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At Wingspread, if I recall correctly, the entire dining room table mechanically retracts, dishes and all, into the kitchen!
Strikes me as humorous.
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jmcnally



Joined: 24 Apr 2010
Posts: 855

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

just a quick note - it's called "Kentuck Knob," without the "y." I am constantly misspelling it because my fingers want to type the more familiar word.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not "automatically" but by sliding -- probably on hidden wheels -- through an opening in the wall between dining space and kitchen. Pretty neat idea, actually -- and a lot simpler than the dining table that disappears through the floor to a loading area below. Where did we see that ?


Here's a table I drew a couple of years ago. It's pinned to a wall track doubling as a display ledge; when needed it is pivoted away from the wall and slid to the left, still stabilized by being attached to its track.




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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7490

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know why perfectly functional things need to be reinvented. Tables with leaves have been around for centuries. We had a Haywood Wakefield that, fully extended, filled the dining room and sat 12. With two wide leaves removed, and the drop leaves dropped, it was a small incident next to the wall, out of the way. The thin leaves fitted easily into a closet.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Precisely. It has to be remembered that one of the sworn duties of the modern architect was/is to take nothing as a given, and to freely invent new solutions to old problems !

Investigating Wright's work (for instance) without acknowledging this fact is to start out on one leg.

The table above has the peculiarity that it converts from a buffet or work-table function to a dining function with a minimum of fuss or displacement. But it could just as well be a conventional four-legged table; it just looks more at home in its environment as configured, and has no legs at the corners to interfere with free use. After being moved to the "open" position, it could be slid right or left as desired . . .

SDR
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Mod mom



Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 383

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really hate auto correct sometimes. I knew it was Kentuck, just didn't edit my post :oops: I'm always changing Glenbrow from their corrected Glen Brow.

Sorry about that...corrected.
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Mod mom



Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 383

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks SDR for your suggestions.

Roderick, I have a dining room that will infrequently host large parties and would like to use that room with it's wonderful wall of french doors as a sitting room. We have 8 Eames molded plywood dining room chairs that will function well for grouping for a sitting area. My thoughts are to be able to re-use portions of the table and rearrange the seating so that the room will be used more often. Our living room (the former dormitory with horizontal windows) has our stereo and television in it and I like the idea of having a room for guests without those distractions.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good. Do you have a design in mind, or do you plan to construct a table like the one at Kentuck Knob -- or start from scratch with your own ?

With a newly poured and probably perfectly flat floor you should have minimal trouble with aligning the two halves of your table when they are together. I've done some thinking about what sort of latch and/or pin arrangement would keep them together and aligned. Standard leaf tables typically use catches similar to ones used to keep double-hung sash closed. Having a lip on the edge of the table(s) complicates matters, though. It may be that you won't need any sort of hardware. (The small size of the table-ettes at G/W, and their even smaller leg spread, contributes greatly to their unwillingness to align neatly.)

Can't wait to see what develops. You all seem to have solved nicely every problem that's come up in your interesting project . . .

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 708
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR,
I like that pivoting table idea. A nice version would be if different wall paneling coursing allowed for the table to work that slot into the plank spacing (a deviation from the classic Usonian board size).

Regarding the modular table idea, here's a version of that concept. We made the table out of the same wood we used in the structure (reclaimed Douglas Fir) and tucked the extension pieces between the posts on either side of the space. When the need arises to extend the table they pull the extensions into place.

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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice. If the tables are made of hollow sections, they would be light enough to be moved easily by two -- and they seem like they would align with little trouble. Was the reclaimed material used as a 3/4" solid on the tables ?

I enjoy the robust modernism I see emanating from your office. Could those be Dakota Jackson chairs, or did you do those too ?

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 708
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I recall, that was a pretty chunky furniture using fairly thick solid stock (having been taken from reclaimed old heavy timber pieces). I don't recall just how heavy they were but they were solid enough to sit still when in use. No wobbling. I seem to recall we had some sort of hook & eye thing on the underside of the tables to fasten them together if desired.

And, you have a good eye -- Dakota Jackson, indeed!
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These are the chairs the new SF public library chose, two decades ago. They are sturdy and comfortable sans upholstery, made entirely of laminated wood.


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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 708
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sturdy but elegant
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