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Wright Model Making?
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ZacharyMatthews



Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A company located in Norman Oklahoma has done several Falling Water models
scaled at 1" = 7.25'. These are more museum quality than standard consumer grade, I believe the pricing just north of $6,000 per model.

Follow this link for more info on their model:
https://architectural-models.com/galfallwat.html
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frankly, I'm not entirely happy with the stone on that impressive model. From what can be seen in the photos, the landscaping might be the triumph ?


. .


There are multiple stone textures at Fallingwater; not all walls are created equal---though most are exemplary, in their own right. One sloppy area exists---perhaps done in the earliest stages of construction:





But there is one common denominator which governs all of the examples of Wright's characteristic random ashlar, as seen first at Taliesin North:
there is a base plane, from which randomly-placed stones rise a consistent distance. That is the simple definition, the commonality which unites
the various instances of this stonework across the catalog. After that, it is the carefully-controlled random placement and more or less pronounced
horizontality of those projecting stones, which characterizes this work.

Another refinement is the occasional doubling of these projectors, or a partial overlapping of one by another in successive courses, that introduces
a further level of randomness---and, importantly, a unity---to the pattern.

And, it is vitally important that such stones are placed at considered intervals at the corners of the structure, where they will be seen in profile.

Here is a photo of the west terrace, which is seen in the first model photo above.





This seems to be the "mature" Fallingwater texture, seen in the upper reaches of the structure. Here's another view.


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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twenty-five years earlier, at Taliesin (or in its rebuildings), we see a rougher, more "primitive" version of the type; in one case, at least, all hell breaks loose !


. .


. .


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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2019 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These two examples of Taliesin Ashlar could hardly be more distinct---yet both conform to the basic definition given above. Perhaps they represent opposite poles of the type, the second a considerable refinement of the first ?








I would not fault the maker of a fine model of Fallingwater if he chose to create a master panel of stone and then use casts of it repeatedly
throughout the model. At least there would be a desirable consistency of the texture---and at a considerable savings in effort.

S
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Further evidence of Wright's evolving preferences in stonemasonry: Hillside Home School, 1901, and a pier (designed by whom ?) from 1933. The location and function of the pier has not been revealed, as far as I know.





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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Architectural Models, the maker of the Fallingwater model, apparently made six of these models and offered them through the Fallingwater gift shop. A
link provided to the store is no longer active. The company used Wright's name---presumably with permission ?

What material the company used in the construction of the house model isn't noted. I made a model for an architect friend, a couple of years ago; the
model is at 1/8" scale and used 1/16" and 1/8" acrylic sheet. Window sash and window cut-outs were made by others, using laser technology. Roofs
are removable.

The architect's SketchUp view:



. .

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Matt2



Joined: 30 Dec 2018
Posts: 130

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What material was your model made of? Doesn't look like foam core or museum board.

Any attempt to model masonry accurately would be futile in my opinion...and aburdly expensive. It was done well for the large scale Fallingwater at Moma. Perhaps someone could laser scan a masonry element, then use the resulting files to 3d print a scale model. The hard part then is mass producing such textures as they are more difficult to mold and cast.
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UpOnGoblinHill



Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR wrote:
Twenty-five years earlier, at Taliesin (or in its rebuildings), we see a rougher, more "primitive" version of the type; in one case, at least, all hell breaks loose !


. .


. .




I've said it privately to friends in building and contracting, so I'll say it here as well, I would give an arm and leg to see some well-made veneers based off the original Taliesin stonework. I feel like it has a sort of timeless universality to it.
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9342

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No geologist nor stonemason here, but wouldn't the difference of materials of Hillside (limestone) and Taliesin (sandstone) play a significant role in their respective applications?
Can they be equated reasonably?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Each stone has its own qualities and "likes" to be used in certain ways---which no doubt had an effect on the work we're looking at, in each case. This does not mean that aesthetic comparisons cannot be made ...

My model was made, as noted, of 1/16" and 1/8" white acrylic. The roofs were scored and spray-painted, as were the sash. Hardscape is a combination of acrylic and paper, painted. The house lifts out of its recess, leaving the
hardscape behind.
The site model is 1/8" MDF. The saw is a MicroMark tilting-arbor model with 3" blade. The brown rectangle is a piece of phenolic backer sheet with a slat of wood glued to its underside, mating with the saw-table slot, enabling a
sliding cut.








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m.perrino



Joined: 02 Aug 2007
Posts: 300

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt: If you are so inclined, text me your e mail address to 602.315.0815 and I can send you a few names at T-West who you should contact to perform some due diligence on copyright/names/etc. It can get interesting. For example, my wedding band is 'whirling arrow' - no issues. However, our wedding announcement contained the "Organic Commandments" for which I received written permission to produce. Also, should you be interested in discussing Pauson, I am open to that. Great idea !
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pauson would be a triumph, if well done. Let's hope someone can use redwood, cement, stones, sand---or, better materials in replica.

Are there cactus bonsai ? I suppose not ...

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewtopic.php?t=2489

S
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17887
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Longest Fallingwater flickr album yet---in falling snow, and with oodles of details.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/northerncontinent/4163470021/in/photostream/

S
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David



Joined: 27 Sep 2016
Posts: 136
Location: Madrid, Spain

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 9:23 am    Post subject: Re: Wright Model Making? Reply with quote

Matt2 wrote:
I'm thinking of turning my model-making hobby into a side business. Does this board think there is a market for custom bass wood architectural models of Wright designs? What do you think would be a fair price? The ballpark is easily hundreds and possibly thousands depending on the complexity of the design.


Hi Matt2

If my humble experience as a "virtual" modeler of Wright's works serves as an example, to date my work has not been economically profitable, at least not to the point of being able to justify the amount of work that exists behind each model, not to mention the previous investment in software.

In return, this type of work receives great media attention so you can always use it as a form of self-marketing to promote your work and make yourself known among amateurs and architecture offices.

I hope it helps
_________________
David Romero
www.hookedonthepast.com
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9342

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2019 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David, some things take a long time. You are building a reputation that will serve you well in the future.

"Profit-taking as a motive for a civilization does not seem to be the ennobling basis for one."
Frank Lloyd Wright
Architectural Forum
January 1938
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