Metzger House

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Meisolus
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Metzger House

Post by Meisolus »

I've been digging through my Wright books lately, and I'm becoming extremely intrigued by the unbuilt Victor E. Metzger House of 1902. It was published in the Wasmuth, and there seem to be a number of perspectives floating around out there. To me, it appears huge, robust, and inviting. I'm rather smitten, but I don't know what all is out there. Visions of Wright has plans for the first and second (though not third) floors that look quite well worked out. Was there a full drawing set? Is there enough information to actually build the thing? It would have been a truly heroic house...

https://visionsofwright.wordpress.com/2 ... ouse-1902/

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Metzger is a predecessor of DD Martin. Give Martin a 2-story living room, bays at either end of the Trinity Room, and a tower, and you have Metzger.

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

Based on the plans on Visions of Wright, I didn't think the living room was 2 stories. To me the area labeled 'balcony' looks like a huge open air room that has enclosed rooms off of it. What do you think Roderick?

JimM
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Post by JimM »

Definitely a two-story living room... enlarged you can clearly see "Balcony", and also roof support posts and/or vertical design element on top of the guard rail in front of the fireplace.

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

I agree with your assessment. Is that a fireplace on the balcony as well, or just a recess?

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The plan is actually a development of the LHJ "A Home in a Prairie Town," which also has a 2-story living room. See Section, plate 60 in Hitchcock.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Quick photos/scans. There are also two view drawings, in Monograph 1.



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© 1986 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

THANK YOU SDR!!!

Wow, what a beauty! And what a monster. Could you imagine being up on that third floor up on a hill overlooking Lake Michigan? Gorgeous stuff.

In my researches, I found that Paul Kruty had a model made of the house for an exhibition several years ago. The catalogue is hard to find and rather expensive for the number of pages, but I found a full scan online.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... 1up&seq=65

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Right and left arrows on the keyboard are useful in scrolling on that page.



The Wasmuth plates, 9a and 9b. Differences between the two versions of the plan are numerous...


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SDR
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Post by SDR »

The third-level roof is of a slightly steeper pitch than that of the lower-level roofs. The purpose of this move is nicely demonstrated in
Wright's perspective views of the house; the designer wants both roofs to be equally visible at certain distances from the structure.

S

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Finally, for the published material, we have the two view drawings and Bruce Pfeiffer's text from Monograph 1.


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Image 0209.05


Image 0209.04
Image Wasmuth


The Wasmuth drawing is a tracing of an original studio perspective published in the Monograph---with one significant change to the architecture.

In Paul Kruty's comments on the house he mentions that the angled piers to the central volume are eliminated in the Wasmuth version of the design. While this is true of the revised plan, one of the Wasmuth view drawings---the one copied from
an earlier sheet---retains this feature.

And although a fireplace at the mezzanine level is mentioned by Pfeiffer, and shown on Plate 445 (above), the section drawing from the same set eliminates that fireplace.

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Imagine how hot sitting anywhere near the huge mezzanine fireplace would have been.
Seems like an odd thing to have included at any step of the design.

Metzger is indeed impressive, if a bit hefty and over-grand. DD Martin is a much more refined version.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Image

Image
© 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation


Image "A Home in a Prairie Town" 1900
Image Metzger 1901
Image Martin 1904

© The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

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