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Roderick Grant
Posts: 9873
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

It may be difficult to maintain exposed rafters, but it can be done. Many of the classic houses by the brothers Greene of Pasadena, such as Gamble, Blacker and Thorsen, have them in abundance (though not extending as much as the Harris design), and they seem to be in good shape.

Early photos of the Harris house show beams that are either finished with a clear substance or not finished at all. I am not sure the house is still standing, since I have never seen any later photos.

SDR
Posts: 18796
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I had intended to show examples of Greene & Greene protected rafters---and couldn't find a single photo, in Makinson or Current, of such work. Odd;
I know I've seen them: copper molded to the top sides of rounded wood members, attached with many small nails. Perhaps I saw them only in the flesh.

S

Matt2
Posts: 198
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Post by Matt2 »

The Blacker house was extensively repaired with many new rafters. And Southern California doesn't have the precipitation and temp changes as northern states. Of course, all that summer sun may be damaging to wood in different ways than lots of rain.

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