House in Berkeley, CA

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SDR
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House in Berkeley, CA

Post by SDR »

House in Berkeley, CA, built in 1980. I assume the parquet floors are not original, but updated kitchen and bath(s) seem admirable.

I wonder who designed it . . .

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/252- ... 0671_zpid/

SDR

Matt
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Post by Matt »

I think "designed" is being generous.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Not to your taste, Matt ?

SDR

Matt
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Post by Matt »

Nope. There is no balance here or repose. The angled roof is angled to an absurd degree. Why? The masonry mass is so tall that is feels like it might snap. And the upper mass to the right of the masonry is heftier than the mass beneath it. In general, I like the "weight" of a design on the lower levels, otherwise it feels top-heavy and structurally precarious.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Fair enough. Is there anything about it that appeals to you ?

I see a simple, even conventional (but asymmetrical) building envelope, broken up into agreeable smaller shapes on the exterior, housing a variety of interior volumes, many of them warm and cozy, with the bones of the wooden structure proudly, even exuberantly on display.

Boulder masonry like this can be difficult to pull off; here there is a successful employment of it, uniform in texture. Perhaps the cantilevering of the stone over the fireplace opening doesn't catch my eye because I've become so used to seeing it in Wright's later work . . . ?

SDR

Matt
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Post by Matt »

The kitchen and baths look very sleek and well done. The rest feels chaotic to me. Not a huge fan of angled beams. The living room fireplace is nice, but I can't imagine feeling cozy with three stories of airspace overhead. I think they picked too dark a stain for the wood.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I must agree with Matt on this one. It appears to me that the entire opus was meant to be outré to attract attention. Editing out that ridiculous acute-angled element might help, but it wouldn't save the house.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

I’m not sure the photographer has helped matters here. Some of the chaos might be due to the random placement of the camera.

jay
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Post by jay »

I find the stone masonry and wood shafts to be the most interesting aspect of the house... From the pool view, looking back at the full house, the shafts appear to both reach down into the slope, while also reaching for the sky. Seems like a pleasant effect, as the pool wing (an addition?) defines the ground level horizontal plane, creating an expansiveness, with the shafts as the focal point. (Almost like a "T" laying on its side)

That said, why is there such a steep, sheltering roof? It reminds me of the "Below Zero" Wright design we discussed here not long ago. Perhaps the sheltering roof was to shield the street-side of the house, but if that's the case, why doesn't the house then open outwards in the other direction? (where the pool wing is)... There are many neat aspects of the house, like the corner window "exposed nook" of the living space, but at least from these pictures, I don't get where the main space actually is. It feels overly compartmentalized.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Now, if only someone could identify that curious oversized metal mailbox in the middle of the chimney . . . !





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DRN
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Post by DRN »


nickB
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Post by nickB »

WOW so amazing. it's my dreamhouse.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The close up views of interior spaces makes the house look better than taking in the entirety of it, which looks like a disorganized jumble.

Rood
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Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

The house has a certain elegance and style ... but I agree with Roderick. The one story wing in particular gives the appearance of an afterthought, something not quite digestible.

It might not be pleasant to stand near the three-story rubble-stone fireplace mass, either ... during an earthquake. All the King's horses and all the King's men .... would have a hard time picking up the pieces.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

I like this house. Particularly, the foliage going on around it, and the way the house works itself into it and on down the hillside.
I'm not much attracted to the yabba dabba doo stone pattern (I prefer integrating horizontal bed joints) but I do like the fact that the stone matches the boulders scattered thru the site.
It suffers from no shortage of exterior wall acne, which is unfortunate. I think the silver protruberance on the chimney catching SDR's attention is likely a kitchen exhaust hood outlet.
I think the interior images SDR's presented above are very inviting. I wouldn't change much there other than replacing the parquet flooring. Big wide dark planks.
Man oh man, those are some heroically large pieces of glass on the side of the steep roof. Contemplate that top triangular one. How difficult to install it? How delicate would that acute angle be up near its tip?

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