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Prairie-style home in Wichita, KS for sale

 
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Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3932
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:42 pm    Post subject: Prairie-style home in Wichita, KS for sale Reply with quote

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/realestate/700000-homes-in-kansas-florida-and-texas.html

Wichita, Kan. | $685,000

A 1922 house with three bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms

Designed by Don Buel Schuyler, an apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright, this house has many features — harvest colors, decorative glazing, built-in furniture — typical of the older architect’s Prairie style. It is in the College Hill neighborhood, two blocks from Wright’s Allen House, which Mr. Schuyler also worked on, and less than 10 minutes from downtown.


Nice house, but Schuyler was obviously not an apprentice based on the year of the house. Has anyone ever heard of him? I checked John Geiger's list of apprentices and associates and did not find him.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16027
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.bhamwiki.com/w/Don_Buel_Schuyler

http://lookingback.blogs.tuscaloosanews.com/11728/looking-back-don-buel-schuyler/

https://museums.ua.edu/event/exhibit-the-modernization-of-tuscaloosas-built-environment-the-architecture-of-don-buel-schuyler-1937-1964-57/

https://livingnewdeal.org/projects/queen-city-pool-house-tuscaloosa-al/
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3545
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suppose the word "apprentice" is at issue...prior to 1932, people working in Wright's studio were "employees", not always consistently paid, but they were paid nonetheless. It would seem Mr. Schuyler was one these people. Richard Neutra, R.M.Schindler, Henry Klumb, Antonin Raymond, Taylor Woolley, and others fall into this category of studio staff.
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Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3932
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DRN,
Which of John Geiger's lists did you find his name?
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Michael Shuck



Joined: 06 Apr 2006
Posts: 191
Location: Wichita, KS

PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've not been in it but have driven by it many times. It's beautiful. I think it looks as if Lloyd Wright might have had his hand in its design, but pretty sure not. During Christmas it is beautifully lit.
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3545
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven’t had the opportunity to dive in, but a citation at a respected university about the content of one of its archival collections lends some credibility over and above a realtor listing:
http://content.lib.auburn.edu/cdm/ref/collection/testfa/id/1621

The word “apprenticeship” is there as well. Not sure if Schuyler was an apprentice if he was paid or if indeed he was paid. I suppose the correspondence or business papers at the Wright archive would be the final arbiter.
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Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3932
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DRN,
Your site says that he received his architecture degree (presumably undergraduate at age 21) in 1916. Since it is generally accepted that Wright did not start his apprentice program until 1932, he would have been 37 at that time (a bit old to start an apprenticeship since he already has a degree). What did he do with his architecture degree in the intervening 16 years?

Employee, maybe. Apprentice, no.
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8457

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whatever his relationship with FLW was, he produced a handsome house that was more 'informed' by FLW than 'copied.'
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3545
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul.
I believe you are missing the point of my earlier message...I don't believe Mr. Schuyler was at Taliesin in the period 1932-1959. I believe he was at Taliesin much earlier, closer to 1916. Wright, prior to 1932, paid those who worked for him, not consistently, but they were paid. I believe Mr. Schuyler was likely a paid employee, much as Taylor Woolley and others were pre-1932. I believe he called himself, or was called by others an "apprentice" during this phase of his career.
The word "apprentice" may be confusing the issue....there are those who call a graduate architect's work with a licensed practitioner prior to the graduate's licensure "an apprenticeship" despite the graduate architect being paid as an employee. Most states, even in the early 20th century, required graduates to work for some period with a licensed practitioner prior to licensure examination. The term used today is "intern", but I have still heard the term "apprentice" used by older practitioners.
We Chatters and Wright used the term "Apprentice" for those who paid Wright to work with him in the period 1932-1959. We even call Wes, Jack, Gene, Davy, and other "Seniors", "Apprentices" even though they all likely stopped paying to work at Taliesin by the end of WW2, and their duties were more akin to professional staff or associates.
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