Article: Paul Hanna and the Hanna House - Stanford, CA

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SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

"I have a huge chair that needs two to carry it. When I want to move it, I just lift it so there is only one foot on the floor, and then twist."

Right on. I have learned to move heavy sheets of material around the shop, in and out of racks and on and off horizontal panel saws, tilting them on their corners, or swiveling them on a scrap-block center pivot.


"Best to keep both feet on the floor at 11 and 1 o'clock."

So, we're talking about "active" seating -- a two-legged stool or maybe one of those folding spike seats . . . How relaxing. No need for none of that steenkin' "lumbar support" !

SDR

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
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Post by SDR »

Mr Wright, trying to look comfortable on a comfortable modern rocker -- and missing. Maybe it was the wrong chair for the occasion ?


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Mr Wright, looking perfectly comfortable in a wooden armchair:


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Mr Wright could find some use for a chair . . . !


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DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Hanna dining chair=Wrightian shooting stick.....I’ll accept that.

I believe the photo of Wright looking uncomfortable at Taliesin West had more to do with the blazing heat and still air than the comfort of a well designed Danish rocker.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Well -- but he's sitting at attention, on a lounging chair. Clearly the wrong hardware ? He must have possessed the back that a drafter has or acquires, to sit upright or bend over a table for hours, days, years . . .

Maybe he couldn't quite relax in front of a client. At a picnic, he could let go ?

Here's the uncropped photo, from "Merchant Prince and Master Builder." Another and even more relaxed and opulent Kaufmann is paired with the Wright clip on the cover of that book.


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DRN
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Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

That incredibly animated cover pic of EJ is crying out for a caption....

SDR
Posts: 19816
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Indeed. I think that's a dog on his lap, if that's of any use. The setting is Fallingwater, clearly, judging by the stonework and the stump table ? Could those be the stairs up, behind him ?

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The photo of EJ with dog is published in full, at small size, in the book, page 45. Edgar, jr's hand is seen here at lower right; he's seated looking at his father, as is Liliane, who's at far right and laughing, looking at EJ.

The photo is dated c. 1938. The furniture is said to have come from their cottage.

SDR

DRN
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Post by DRN »

EJ is sitting just to the south of the stair leading up to the bedrooms with his back to the wall which screens the main entrance hall. He is opposite the fireplace and wall which separates the kitchen from the dining area.

The relative formality of EJ’s clothing, as opposed to hiking or riding attire, makes me think the setting is evening cocktails before dinner.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

At T West ? Or at FW ?

SDR

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

SDR, thanks for posting from the Stan - archives
much appreciated.

I assume you saw some of those full scale millwork sheets

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes. Harold Turner was introduced to Mr Wright at the beginning of this job, in 1936; he went with Paul to Taliesin where Turner spent time with Wright, in the drafting room and at meals, and even helped with construction there. P. 32.

SDR

DRN
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Post by DRN »

At T West ? Or at FW ?
At FW with the dog.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

SDR: On the sections you posted from Hanna's book there are notes
calling the major head beams out as:
"2 - 2x16 trussed together with no. 2 telegraph wire"

You have any clue what's going on there?

Tom
Posts: 3214
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Only thing I can think of is that the wire is secured at one end of the beam
and then wound around and down the length, say at 12" o.c., and secured at the other end.

...maybe, if the beams were notched top and bottom everywhere the wire crossed, then the wire would reinforce the beam in a "trussed" action ...?

I've never, ever, heard of anything like this before

You'd have to really work hard to get tension on that wire.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes -- that would be nonsense, even for Wright.

Here's what he proposed, when flitch plates he specified didn't pass "local engineering advice." For reasons that Paul muddles in the book, the wires
were not used after all, and the flitch plates proved adequate over time. If you can't make out his handwriting, I'll attempt to translate. It seems a 40-foot
beam was actually a 24-foot span between "fixed sash" . . .

Note that the wires were to supplement the flitch plates, not replace them.



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