Le Corbusier reborn: Unite’ d’Habitation Berlin

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peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Le Corbusier reborn: Unite’ d’Habitation Berlin

Post by peterm »


SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

https://www.lescouleurs.ch/en/the-colou ... ur-system/

Note that the palette of 1931 contains desaturated versions of the intense hues; the 1959 one omits these. The colors seen in the reproduced apartment seem a bit harsh and unmodulated, placing unharmonious colors next to each other in some cases.

It would be great to see how LC employed these palettes in his interiors. Note the healthy amount of white among the bright colors applied to the exterior of the Zurich exposition pavilion of 1963, seen on the linked page.

SDR

peterm
Posts: 6193
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

In the later works he was especially fond of intense shades of green combined with a French’s mustard yellow, hot red, and deep charcoals, always contrasted with a pure white, unlike Wright, who was leaning towards turquoise, harvest gold, rose, of course, his Cherokee red, and avoiding bright white like the plague. Le Corbusier was arguably first and foremost a painter, and his interiors reflected that through every phase of his career. The earlier colors were odd combinations of pastels and de Stijl primaries.

1950s:

https://thespaces.com/2016/12/07/le-cor ... world/amp/

https://pin.it/hkiajjrd44apak

There was also the ultramarine blue, shown here in his own apartment:

https://pin.it/s4om57wjioundl

Another lovely shade of blue:

https://pin.it/ms6d542houk3js

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

There is not much information on the Unite's shopping mall. Is that still extant, or has its use changed?

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Roderick:
Did all the Unite's Marseille, Berlin, Firminy, and two others, have the commercial component? At Marseille, the commercial bit serves as a visitor center and place to rent a unit (LeCorbusier Hotel of sorts for Architourists). I can't seem to find if there are operating shops...

A Google image search of "Unite d'Habitation shops"
https://www.google.com/search?q=unite+d ... 71&bih=914


Pics and visitor information about the Marseille Unite:
http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/marseille/index.htm

https://www.dezeen.com/2014/09/15/le-co ... hitecture/


On topic...I like LeCorbusier's colors. There is a richness and sense of joy to them, particularly when paired with wood in the later work. It is a shame most photos of LC's early work were long published only in black and white...one wonders if he would have been perceived differently. LC's use and apparent love of color had a great influence on Michael Graves' early work...Richard Meier must have "edited" the color out, or only viewed B&W pics of Corb's work ;)
Will I be required to turn in my Wright Decoder Ring now?

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

"When the building first opened, the seventh and eighth floors were home to an assortment of shops, eateries, galleries and a hostel where residents could invite guests to stay. Sixty years on they are much the same, although the hostel has become a hotel and many of the shops have been taken over by more specialist businesses, from medical practitioners to architects."

That is what I thought would happen to that area. "Walk in" commercial ventures, located in private residential buildings that don't provide immediate access to public spaces are unlikely to remain as intended. The uses are now, it seems, no longer dependent on pedestrians stopping by for a nosh and coffee. If the ground level were filled in with shops and easy pedestrian access, they would thrive.

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

The Villa Savoye is more colorful inside than the b&w photos we often see, but all pastels, which are supposed to be authentic.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I have a color palette of my own: the 1940s version of Necco Wafers. The lemon, lime, chocolate, etc. candies were richly colored with slightly grayed hues that were both vibrant and subdued. The medium saturation muffled the blare of the colors. In later year, perhaps to appeal to a different generation of kids, the colors became more intense, too loud.

I was never a fan of the taste, especially licorice, which I hate. I bought them for the colors.

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