Wright Chat

 
FAQ FAQ Register Register
Search Search Profile Profile
Memberlist Memberlist Log in to check your private messages Log in to check your private messages
Usergroups Usergroups Log in Log in

>> Return to SaveWright Home Page

1940 FLW Counter Tops and Area Rugs

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
carol1988



Joined: 09 May 2018
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 10:43 pm    Post subject: 1940 FLW Counter Tops and Area Rugs Reply with quote

What type of counter tops was FLW specifying in 1939 and 1940?

What type of area rugs?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Red linoleum.

Area rugs would be cream to beige wool, with the exception of rugs which he designed specifically for a house. Those would be composed of patterns which directly or indirectly related to the geometry of the house.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Modmom1



Joined: 03 Dec 2017
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having just completed our restoration, I too just went through the daunting task of finding an area rug for our living room. I first chose a color palette, which in our case borrowed from the stone and mosses outside:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125471081@N02/42386304982/in/album-72157650444413635/

We first first had cushions made for our built-in sofa in a stone/mushroom neutral color in a solid since the stone wall behind it had both texture and variation in color. Next came the pillows. I purchased a couple handmade pillows from an artist friend that went perfectly with our palette. Then came the area rug. We wanted a tufted wool rug for comfort but knowing there was going to be a new puppy in our near future, decided against spending a great deal or finding an heirloom piece. We had a difficult time in that the green I chose was difficult to find and we needed a rug that would work with the stone,orange concrete green and maize colors, and yet not be too dark for the room. Here is what we bought after looking at thousands of samples:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125471081@N02/41713429244/in/album-72157650444413635/

Hope this helps in your decision making. I found this site a wealth of information in helping us in our project. Good luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As much as I appreciate the creative and personal choices that Dori mentions above, I will return to the question as to what was specified and used by Wright and his clients, circa 1939/1940.

https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/interior-view-of-the-living-room-at-the-lloyd-lewis-house-a-news-photo/92485798

Zimmerman:



Last edited by peterm on Tue May 29, 2018 5:11 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8420

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Color is less of a problem with floor covering than pattern. Too much pattern can be distracting, like boldly patterned and colored socks with a tuxedo. The eye should always be drawn up.

Last edited by Roderick Grant on Tue May 29, 2018 2:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Various Usonian kitchen photos from the 40s and fifties.

Many of these are Formica laminate; earlier examples would have been coved linoleum. Nearly all were some shade of red:


Walter (Cedar Rock)


Walter (Cedar Rock)


Pope


Schwartz


Walter (Cedar Rock)


Rosenbaum



Gordon


David Wright

Lamberson:







Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alsop:

https://www.gettyimages.com/license/92391984

https://www.gettyimages.com/license/92391996

Erdman Prefab, (which one?):

https://www.gettyimages.com/license/50664457

Wright’s home in his own time:

https://www.gettyimages.com/license/92555651

Walker house kitchen:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-j1LfK_e8WNk/T_jDc7NjSHI/AAAAAAAACB8/79QnDqOU6oo/s1600/CIMG4570.JPG
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the other hand, a confident connoisseur can break the rules. What is truly beautiful should always work. Pattern used effectively at Fallingwater:

https://pufflesandhoneyadventures.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/p5192821.jpg

https://pufflesandhoneyadventures.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/p5192758.jpg

https://pufflesandhoneyadventures.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/images-63.jpg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15940
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any space can be over-decorated; Wright's work isn't immune to the impulse. Still, those two examples aren't bad, as the textiles are genuine as opposed to
ersatz. The simple rug in the guest quarters dates to the original occupants, I believe. Can the same be said of the rug that covers a large portion of the
floor in the main house ?

Objects on display in the home are typically pieces of the owner's collection; once an item has been acquired, it is natural to want to have it on view. To
what extent are such objects chosen on the basis of their compatibility, and when are they simply precious material ? I credit most Wright home-owners
with sensitivity to the effects of individual objects in their collection on the overall aesthetic of the space(s). Still, the tendency to crowd the environment
is ever-present, for understandable reasons.

When we consider an historic house, it seems to me that restricting the decor to objects originally found in the house makes sense; every added feature
chosen at a later time has the potential to dilute the particularity of the historic environment.

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would never consider Fallingwater to be overdecorated (with the exception of those stuffed animals pretentiously placed on the carpet. Edgar Junior’s childhood playthings?) In fact, I would look to it as a prime example of how one can tastefully display collections in Wright’s architecture.

https://en.wikiarquitectura.com/building/ocatillo-desert-camp/

Scroll to the photo of Lloyd Wright playing the piano. Well designed objects enhancing the architecture and reminding us of its relationship to the location, history and site.


Last edited by peterm on Wed May 30, 2018 9:51 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15940
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That Ocotillo photo has all the right elements: textiles that are "genuine" in their design and construction; that are related
to each other and are sympathetic to Wright's structure; and that are the original (historic) decor.

Wouldn't it be great to have that image in color ? Even in monotone it is perfect, isn't it . . .

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5797
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure is.

So carol1988- What are your thoughts? Are you working on a Wright or Wright inspired house from 1940?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Modmom1



Joined: 03 Dec 2017
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course Peter is correct in suggesting the colored laminates demonstrated in his photos above, for Mr. Wright's Usonians. I first responded to Carol's questions regarding soapstone, and shared my experience. My home, Glenbrow, is not a Wright house but rather an important example of Mr Wright's influence on his apprentices. Although we were respectful of the original house, our efforts aimed towards making the house a home suitable for our lifestyle, rather than a museum level restoration.

Glenbrow (built in 1940) had butcher block as their original countertops, but they were long gone when we purchased the dilapidated house. Our first apprentice home, the Noverre Musson house, had butcher block as countertops when we purchased it. Mr Musson was a bachelor who seldom used his kitchen and yet the butcher block was in poor shape with stains and water damage. Being an avid baker, cook and someone who entertains, I had initially wanted stainless steel (as used in Kentucky Knob) for a durable surface rather wood and preferred a neutral color, but as I mentioned before, my architect husband nixed stainless. I appreciated the kitchen that DRN and his wife created for the FLW Sweeton House, which uses a dark granite.


If in the future, someone wants to replace our stone counters to a more appropriate butcher block (as was installed by Smith, van Fossen & Cuneo) it can be still be done but for our lifestyle and against the coarse laid stone, I believe the soapstone best meets our needs. Again, our home is NOT a Wright design.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8420

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I personally would never want butcher block countertops. No matter how rigorously they are cleaned, eventually they look terrible. Other than the table in the Exhibition House, which has a butcher block top (counters of stainless steel), did FLW ever use that material in other houses?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rood



Joined: 30 Oct 2010
Posts: 991
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roderick Grant wrote:
I personally would never want butcher block countertops. No matter how rigorously they are cleaned, eventually they look terrible. Other than the table in the Exhibition House, which has a butcher block top (counters of stainless steel), did FLW ever use that material in other houses?


Don't know about other houses, but the same circular butcher-block tables were usedin the kitchens at both Hillside and at Taliesin West, and they were used for many years ... Scrubbed often and well, they always looked well. Not sure if they are still in use ....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP