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Westhope Original block color
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16388
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite. Sweeney: "Jones's four-acre site sloped down gently to the north and overlooked the hills of the Arkansas River valley for forty miles; Turkey
Mountain could be seen to the southwest." Jones to Wright: "The best exposure for bedrooms is south, so get as many bedrooms for the south as
[you] can work in, for our cool breeze in the warm weather is always from the south. If possible I would like to have a roof [of] part of the first floor
flat so that it could be used as a summer terrace and this should be a roof that would give us a view to the south, west, and north. The least desirable
outlook is toward the east . . . Over the garage we should have about three servants rooms and they could have a balcony which would face the east,
therefore giving us the protection facing the street."

I guess Jones expected his servants to spend the evening on their balcony, facing the "least desirable outlook" and watching for bandits . . .

"In the summer of 1929, as requested, Wright prepared a new scheme, based on the square grid. The basic layout of the house was unchanged;
Wright simply modified the geometry. Jones liked the plan, but he still questioned the "alternate vertical strips of wall and glass"; he explained that
he could not stand in the center of the living room and see Turkey Mountain, to the southwest. In short, he 'would infinitely rather have your old style of
architectural exterior, with the long horizontal windows.' "

" ' As usual,' Wright responded, 'you misinterpret a good many points on the plan.' He explained that the house was oriented to the most important view,
down the length of the court." So much for accommodating -- or even acknowledging -- his client's specific request . . .

SDR

“Wright in Hollywood,” Robert L Sweeney
© 1994 by the Architectural History Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3603
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Same with Turkel. There are, effectively, no views in the living room of Turkel because of the insistent grid of concrete,
so planting a forest-like screen of verdure would help decorate the interior.

The Turkel living room has views beyond its patio to a mature and very well landscaped deep side yard. From within the house, there is little if any reminder that there are houses beyond. Westhope would benefit from a "Turkelization" of its landscape.

It is interesting to see the 1930's photos of Jones...one wonders what Wright envisioned for its landscape in the future...did he imagine it would remain a grassy great plain?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16388
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, we could look at where Westhope got its bones. Two of the Los Angeles block houses have colonnades -- three, if you count the block posts between doors to the lower
terrace at Millard -- and in them the spaces between columns is at least twice as wide as the columns themselves.


Then came San Marcos. The plans show no colonnades at all; dotted lines on the drawings turn out to be grid numbers. The vertical block-wall striations are all but opaque.











Out of the San Marcos project came the Ralph and Wellington Cudney residences. House I, uniquely, has a diagonal expression on the exterior; the plans show no colonades, though there is a window wall at the
servant rooms with equally-spaced blocks and voids.








The Cudney house II exterior resembles the San Marcos wall; here for the first time we have colonnades of diamond-shaped block separated by strips of glass. Significantly, the glass is twice as wide as the column.














And from there it is a short hop and a skip to the first Jones plan. A significant difference, as it turned out, is the spacing of the block columns: contrary to all previous examples, here the column and the glass are equal in width.














Thence, the second Jones plan. The equal width of column and glass is retained. North is at the bottom of the plan sheets.








The exterior view is from the street (east), matching the aerial view of the model.







© 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

© 1985 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

“Wright in Hollywood,” Robert L Sweeney
© 1994 by the Architectural History Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8669

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first time FLW used the run of columns and windows was at the Director's House, or as it is called, Residence A, at Barnsdall.
There's controversy over authorship of the house, many giving credit entirely to RMS, who was in charge of construction.
But the concept of the north window wall was FLW's.
The problem with it is that it interrupts the view. From the living room, one can see the Ennis house in the hills in slices, interrupted by intermittent columns defeating the view.
A balcony was originally outside these windows, from which a clear view was available, but from inside the house, it may as well not be there at all. At Lloyd-Jones, that was deliberate.

RMS returned to that pattern at the four duplexes he designed for
O. S. Floren in 1923, with columns 16"x12" set 16" apart, which work no better.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16388
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's design ideology triumphant over function. Wright was neither the first nor the last practitioner to make that choice. What's a superior designer with "principles" and "Ideas" to do ? Let them eat cake; the world cheers.

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16388
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The windows in the tallest element of the house are different in some way from all the others. Are there any close-up photos of those windows ?

Here's the house, this year -- like many another Wright residence, surrounded now by younger neighbors. How big is four acres -- the original property -- in this view ? That is, how many other houses now accompany Westhope
on that acreage ?


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ZacharyMatthews



Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Posts: 58

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Which critic was it who said the house looked like a pickle factory?"

That line was a credited passerby who stopped as Bruce Goff was standing on the curb looking at the house with Mueller.

"what are they building here?"

A new home by Frank Lloyd Wright


"well it looks like a pickle factory!"
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8669

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Zachary.
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3603
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More pics here:
https://tulsatinystuff.blogspot.com/2017/09/frank-lloyd-wrights-westhope.html
Includes a version of the oft told "roof is leaking on my.....Well, move your......" anecdote. One wonders which, if any (or all), were true.

Bio of Richard Lloyd Jones:
http://uudb.org/articles/richardlloydjones.html
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