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radiant heat piping repair
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Mod mom



Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joe said they are cast iron floor registers and when you remove the panel it says Burnham. This is what is looks like with the panel removed:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125471081@N02/34426453241/in/dateposted-public/

(Im posting this because although Joe said cast iron it appears as copper to me)
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3034
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The feeds and returns on yours are copper, but the black portion is cast iron, which gets hot and radiates.

Weil-McLain makes a similar model....
http://www.weil-mclain.com/products/snug-baseboard

The Europeans make some very pricey units:
http://www.runtalnorthamerica.com/residential_radiators/baseboard_uf.html

I'll check the drawings to see what Wright spec'd for the workshop..it may be an upright radiator though. I'd opt for the baseboard for its thin profile, probably leaning toward something looking like a ca.1950 unit. The Weil McLain product seems to do that.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13773
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder how far back baseboard heating goes in this country. It's almost a given that Europe was ahead of us, there -- but it would be interesting to know that, too . . .

Wright's drawings are full of radiators, for the first half of his career, at least. Willey probably has them; he got rid of them for good with "gravity heat," at least in theory.

SDR
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Mod mom



Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know Joe has talked about designing a housing to cover our visible units but Im insisting any cover MUST not effect function.

Our insulation around the periphery must be good because despite being warm and toast inside we never experienced any of the exterior melting talked about up thread.
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7206

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, SDR, Willey has old-fashioned radiators.

I dislike baseboard heating. The baseboard, properly done, can be a significant design element, which the BB heating destroys.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13773
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think any functional object in an interior, if well designed, ought to be displayed undisguised. Mr Wright's principal objection to the radiator might have been limited to its resolute verticality ?

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7206

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may have mentioned this before, but FLW turned a drawing of a radiator on end and wrote under it "Project for a skyscraper."
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3034
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I checked the Sweeton Plumbing and Heating sheet, and was able (with eyeglasses and a magnifying glass) to read the originally spec'd radiator for the workshop: "Sterling-fin type 2", 6'-0" L, 3 units high".

If "3 units high" refers to concrete block courses, that would be 24" tall, or 24" above the floor. Sterling was founded in 1946 and exists today. The company stated the appearance of their Versa Line is virtually unchanged from the product they offered in the 1950's:

http://www.sterlingheat.com/versa-line

Wright was definitely going utilitarian in the workshop.
I'm going to stick with the cast iron baseboard as that is functionally the best choice for the operating temperature of our boiler water...it also has a lower profile to boot.
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 615
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

radiator close to home

(Thomas Heinz photo)
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1905
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(If I remember correctly the building at the man's right elbow in the mural
bears striking resemblance to Unity Temple.)
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