new book on John Howe

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Post Reply
Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4311
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

new book on John Howe

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 19305
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I've been through the book, now, scoping out the images and reading their captions. I wonder if book editors would look more closely at these mini-texts if they were made aware of the percentage of browsers who, like me, "graze" for the low-hanging fruit before diving into the substance. In this case, some surprisingly vague information is imparted in the image captions of this important new publication -- at least in the first half of the story, where architect Howe is still Apprentice Howe.

In his foreword to the book, Wright's arguably most faithful fellow, Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, makes a surprising statement: "Without his cadre of skilled draftsmen, the great work of Frank Lloyd Wright from 1932 to 1959 would never have been accomplished." It's hard to argue with that -- and it's pretty clear that Jack Howe led the pack, literally and figuratively, in making Wright's case via two-dimensional media.

SDR

Surprisingly, Mr Pfeiffer has no Wikipedia page . . .

SDR
Posts: 19305
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

One amusing note: architect and co-author Tim Quigley refers repeatedly to the "three-point perspectives" which Wright taught the young Howe to lay out, and which he or others used endlessly in the drafting rooms of the later Taliesins. In fact, very few three-point perspectives are found among the drawings; virtually all of the house views we see among the presentation drawings are simpler (and perfectly adequate) two-point perspectives . . .

Quigley quotes an apprentice on Olgivanna: "Mrs Wright made life unbearable for married couples, particularly the women." He writes, "As a strong-willed manipulator, Olgivanna resented that Fellowship spouses, such as Lu [Howe], did not look to her for their primary loyalty." "She endeavored to be a third party to every relationship in the Fellowship," wrote [Kamal] Amin. "She needed to be in total control of all situations," he continued, thriving on conflict she intentionally created and making sure that "everyone had to feel guilty about something."

Quigley says that Jack and Lu made a pact not to let the woman come between them; like Wes and Svetlana, they moved off the Taleisin grounds as soon as they could (following their November 1951 marriage). Howe bought land from Wes, across the valley from Taliesin (and with a terrific view), and built a "Wrightian version of an English cottage," called Inwood -- but not before expanding the one-room cabana at Taliesin West which Howe had built for himself in 1948.

SDR

Davion94
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2015 4:48 am

Post by Davion94 »

Wow!I like your post!!

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4311
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

I remember seeing Inwood for sale a few years ago. Someone had replaced the wooden kitchen cabinets with white formica.

The George and Norma Johnson House (1963, pg 118-122) was recently sold (July 30, 2015, $1.875M). It is at 755 Tonkawa Road, Orono, MN on Lake Minnetonka.
http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhom ... 1309-66119

This book is also a history of the Taliesin Fellows as Jack was there from the beginning until 5 years after the end.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 3942
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

This is as good a place as any for this link to the online Howe renderings at UMinn:

https://umedia.lib.umn.edu/taxonomy/term/717

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4311
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

We recently saw the traveling SAMARA exhibit that has made its way to Mason City.

It was very obvious that the elevation drawing (1954) was done by John Howe.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 3942
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

I've been enjoying Hession and Quigley's John Howe book.
In the book is a rendering for a house Howe designed in 1962 for a client named Byron Harrell in Vermillion, SD. The roof eaves have a distinctive serrated profile that I found interesting and unique. I Google'd Harrell and Vermillion, SD and found a link to slides of the built house on a state historical society website:

http://sddigitalarchives.contentdm.oclc ... rm/Harrell

Further Googleling and Google Mapping came up with an address:

1215 Valley View Dr Vermillion, SD

In Google Earth, the house appears as a white roof with serrated edges at the NE end of a very short east/west cul-de-sac. It would appear the "Solar Annex" Howe designed in 1974 that was listed in his online renderings and papers (linked in my earlier post) was built.

perspective:
https://umedia.lib.umn.edu/node/86529

floor plan:
https://umedia.lib.umn.edu/node/86528

solar annex:
https://umedia.lib.umn.edu/node/86530

Post Reply