The Mystery of the Joseph Euchtman House

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Peter Beers
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 6:30 am
Location: Virginia
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The Mystery of the Joseph Euchtman House

Post by Peter Beers »

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As I read through books about Wright's homes, some of the things I find interesting is the amount of information that ISN'T known about particular Wright homes. One of the most mysterious is the Joseph Euchtman House (1939). Located in a north east neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland, there are a lot of photos of this house out there, but absolutely no information at all about who Joseph Euchtman was and how the home came to be. Google, Yahoo, AltaVista and Wikipedia came up with bupkiss except to say that the house exists, was designed by Wright in 1939.



Do any of you know anything about it?



Here's my page on the Euchtman House.



Thanks!



Pete

Guest

Post by Guest »

The story I heard was the design was not that great. The Euchtman only asked FLW to commission the house because of the odd shape of the lot. Your average house could not logically fit on the lot because of the shape. So, Euchtman asked FLW and he accepted.

Peter Beers
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 6:30 am
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Post by Peter Beers »

Anonymous wrote:Your average house could not logically fit on the lot because of the shape. So, Euchtman asked FLW and he accepted.


I agree with that. It would be tough to put a normal house on that lot. In my eyes, the design is perfect for a small family or just a couple. The orientation to the sun is perfect and I like the simplicity of it. I'd need an off-site workshop to work on cars, have a wood shop and fix and store bicycles, but I may need that anyways with my 1950s brick rambler. :D



Pete

guestnow

Post by guestnow »

Peter Beers wrote:[but I may need that anyways with my 1950s brick rambler. :D



Pete


As opposed to a 1950s Nash Rambler?

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