Millard House now sold in three days

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Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4355
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Millard House now sold in three days

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Last edited by Paul Ringstrom on Sat Aug 15, 2020 10:13 am, edited 2 times in total.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 3992
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by DRN »

A lot done to the house in the last 8 years....the kitchen and baths have been tastefully freshened up to today's image of what should be in a house like this. The lighter exterior color is a surprise...I've become accustomed to Wright's early board and batten Prairie era work being rustic and dark in tone.

As a contrast, this is a link to the house's state in 2012:
https://www.realtor.com/news/unique-hom ... -photos-3/

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10335
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Roderick Grant »

At least it's still standing. Back in the 80s, when it was on the market, it was being advertised as a tear-down.

Oak Park Jogger
Posts: 70
Joined: Mon Jan 22, 2007 2:21 pm

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Oak Park Jogger »

I checked the realtor's website and the house is listed as "Contingent." Fast sale???? The house looks lovely!!!!!!! It's had some TLC!

juankbedoya
Posts: 178
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by juankbedoya »

I didn't knew this house... but I love it... let's say it's a "middle class" prairie house... I just hope that this house goes to good hands..!!

SDR
Posts: 19685
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by SDR »

It's always interesting to compare the drawings to the building. I too see this house in its customary brown---though if it had to be painted, I suppose the light colors are useful---from a realtor's perspective, at least ?

https://archive.triblive.com/lifestyles ... yd-wright/

The house is certainly compact---a three- or four-bedroom Prairie at its minimal limit (albeit with two baths)? Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer's Monograph text is a nice ode:

Image


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© The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

juankbedoya
Posts: 178
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by juankbedoya »

SDR wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 11:33 pm
It's always interesting to compare the drawings to the building. I too see this house in its customary brown---though if it had to be painted, I suppose the light colors are useful---from a realtor's perspective, at least ?

https://archive.triblive.com/lifestyles ... yd-wright/

The house is certainly compact---a three- or four-bedroom Prairie at its minimal limit (albeit with two baths)? Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer's Monograph text is a nice ode:

© The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)
I love in both colors, that's the advantage of paint. Same thing with Willits or Hardy... Clearer or darker looks beautiful... Very nice house and I didn't knew that this clients are the same of the textile block house... Thanks for sharing those amazing drawings

SDR
Posts: 19685
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by SDR »

The house was stained originally, not painted; Wright was correct in staying away from paint, as wood movement eventually sheds a film coating, and paint covers the natural colors and textures of the material, leaving only surface irregularities to show through the coating. Instead of natural and harmonious linearity, one gets only the knots and checks.

Only paint on masonry is a greater outrage to the material than is paint on wood. But of course it is the easiest "refresher" for the material---and usually longer lasting than a coat of oil or other transparent/translucent finish, which must be refreshed regularly---so paint wins the battle, far too often. And once applied, it is expensive and time-consuming to get rid of. Wright owners who have taken that onerous step are to be congratulated.

S

Matt2
Posts: 259
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Matt2 »

Interesting that this project was stained. I'm so used to masonry or stucco with the Prairie designs. Was stain a common material at the time? The mid-century architects of Seattle had to work with a local paint company to create stains in their preferred palette...and that was in the 40s and 50s.

SDR
Posts: 19685
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by SDR »

Wright began using horizontal board-and-batten (or, more often, board-and-stick) siding before the turn of the century, first on the Nathan Moore stable (c. 1895) and again at the River Forest Golf Club (1898)---though Manson refers to a "soft brown monotone with shingle siding," there, seemingly in error. The Davenport house (1901) is described by Storrer as having stained board-and-batten siding, as does subsequent rural work: the Heurtley Cottage remodeling, the Whitehall, MI and Lake Delavan, WI houses and cottages. It may be assumed that few if any of these structures were painted rather than stained. Storrer repeats the story about the A P Johnson house at Lake Delavan:

"It is said that when Wright, approaching on horseback via the dirt driveway to supervise final stages of work on this Prairie style house, saw it painted white, he rode away and never returned."

Here is the wall section drawing for the George Millard house. Note the carefully coordinated placement of architectural features in alignment with the board-and-stick siding. The "batten" is actually a fully molded piece formed to interlock with the top and bottom edges of the 7" board, in a manner echoed later in the Usonian board-and-sunk batten detail.

Image

© The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library,
Columbia University, New York)

Reidy
Posts: 1599
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 3:30 pm
Location: Fremont CA

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Reidy »

There's a similar story about Mrs. Gamble in Pasadena, that I've heard more than once. It is said that she was all set to sign on the sale of her house when she overheard one of the prospective buyers say "I think we'll paint it white". She called the deal off on the spot and donated the house to USC instead.

Tom
Posts: 3209
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Tom »

SDR, where does this big drawing of the Millard house come from?

SDR
Posts: 19685
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by SDR »

The monotone Fuller drawings on this page are found in Monograph 2. In addition to what's here, there is a basement plan and a third elevation sheet.

The colored rendering is reproduced as a giant double-age spread in Taschen I.

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10335
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Millard House for sale

Post by Roderick Grant »

With B&B siding, did FLW ever finish with creosote? The Stewart House in Montecito was thus finished, eventually turning pitch black. The owner before the current got some remover from the US Navy, used to clean ship hulls, not available on the market, and removed the accumulation of creosote back down to the original redwood color, as best he could.


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