How to cook in a "workspace" ? Are you sure he was

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juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

How to cook in a "workspace" ? Are you sure he was

Post by juankbedoya »

Well I'm sure many of you like Wright's usonian kitchens or "workspaces" as he liked to called them, but I'm sure many more doesn't like it. Does somebody have true stories of how people (Rosenbaum, Pope Leighey, Baird, Jacobs and most I think) used to cook or what they thought about it? Opposite to it's name I don't find that "space for work", where do I cut, blend, place ingredients? I find a space of 1.2m x 1.2m (4 feet x 4 feet) to "work" and only two persons could be there (already uncomfortable). Where people saved dishes, food, pots..? I find a disproportion between living rooms and "workspaces". The living room of the Rosenbaum house for example is 13 times bigger than it's "workspace". He designed very big and beautiful living rooms that could receive a lot of people for having a great social time but if I have to cook for them... How do I cook in a "workspace" where I don't have precisely a space for work..?? Are you sure he was a genius? If you have stories about what his clients thought and how lived the "workspaces", please share us..!!

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

The Rosenbaums enlarged their kitchen (call it what you will), among other alterations, a few years after they moved in. When Mildred R was the docent corps at her house she said that the original was barely usable once her children outgrew baby food. They kept it as a kind of museum next to the real one. The question of how to fit two into a Usonian kitchen was moot, because the wife was the only one who ever set foot there.

Fawcett has a huge kitchen because it was a working farm and she had to serve breakfast and lunch to the crew each day. In that respect it's quite modern, the kind of place you could bring guests into while you cook.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

I can’t share any stories about the Lambersons and their experience with the kitchen, but I can tell you about ours. It works perfectly for us with the exception of two things. The laminate countertop doesn’t allow hot pots or pans to be placed on the surface, but that could easily be solved by installing a solid surface like stone or engineered stone. (We won’t do that because we choose to honor Wright’s choice.) The other slight annoyance is the cabinet directly above the sink which sometimes gets in the way when scrubbing a large pot.

In terms of storage and circulation, there are no problems whatsoever. In fact, my wife and I both find it a joy to work and cook there. But I think our kitchen might be a tiny bit larger than some of the earlier Usonians. We installed a gas line in order to replace the electric range. (I think all Usonians workspaces were electric if I’m not mistaken.)

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I don't think I've seen a more generous description of living with a Usonian kitchen (workspace, laboratory---there's at least one more) than Katherine Jacobs's account.


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© 1978 by Herbert Jacobs and Katherine Jacobs; Chronicle Books
Last edited by SDR on Fri Dec 06, 2019 7:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Lamberson workspace. The cabinet above the sink is sometimes an annoyance, but it looks so fine, who cares?!

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juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

Reidy wrote:The Rosenbaums enlarged their kitchen (call it what you will), among other alterations, a few years after they moved in. When Mildred R was the docent corps at her house she said that the original was barely usable once her children outgrew baby food. They kept it as a kind of museum next to the real one. The question of how to fit two into a Usonian kitchen was moot, because the wife was the only one who ever set foot there.

Fawcett has a huge kitchen because it was a working farm and she had to serve breakfast and lunch to the crew each day. In that respect it's quite modern, the kind of place you could bring guests into while you cook.
I know the addition almost 10 years later, in fact due to that alteration the front facade is so striking..!! The second workspace is twice bigger and has a utility next to it. I love to cook, and I cook alone for my family (4 adults) but I feel that kitchens very small for prepare food, that's why I wrote the topic, I was so intrigued about that tiny workspaces and how to use them.
Fawcett is other story, it wouldn't be in the list of very small usonian workspaces.

juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

peterm wrote:I can’t share any stories about the Lambersons and their experience with the kitchen, but I can tell you about ours. It works perfectly for us with the exception of two things. The laminate countertop doesn’t allow hot pots or pans to be placed on the surface, but that could easily be solved by installing a solid surface like stone or engineered stone. (We won’t do that because we choose to honor Wright’s choice.) The other slight annoyance is the cabinet directly above the sink which sometimes gets in the way when scrubbing a large pot.

In terms of storage and circulation, there are no problems whatsoever. In fact, my wife and I both find it a joy to work and cook there. But I think our kitchen might be a tiny bit larger than some of the earlier Usonians. We installed a gas line in order to replace the electric range. (I think all Usonians workspaces were electric if I’m not mistaken.)
Thanks for sharing your experience, the workspace of the Lamberson looks a little bit bigger and it has a utility according to the plans.

juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

SDR wrote:I don't think I've seen a more generous description of living with a Usonian kitchen (workspace, laboratory---there's at least one more) than Katherine Jacobs's account.



© 1978 by Herbert Jacobs and Katherine Jacobs; Chronicle Books
OMG that's amazing..!! thanks for share it..!!

juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

peterm wrote:Lamberson workspace. The cabinet above the sink is sometimes an annoyance, but it looks so fine, who cares?!
I had already seen the pictures of your beautiful kitchen on facebook. Well, the only problem for me is the countertop, a material that doesn't support hot objects in a place where the objects are hot, mmm come on ..!! Thanks for the pictures of Lamberson, I fell in love when you published them in fb, I was searching pictures of it but it was a hidden gem until you gentely, share your shots..!!

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Peter, I assume your (and Stafford's) recreation of the Lamberson kitchen puts everything where it was on the original drawings ? It's such a suave
delight.

I worked exclusively with laminates in the early phase of my career---making even monstrous L- and C-shaped counters in a press (with field joints
prepared in the shop) for shipment and assembly on site. The heat problem is a strike against this otherwise durable economy material; it's easy
enough to place a cutting board or other accessory on the counter near the stove. I hope you didn't have to learn that the hard way !

A customer brought us a small kitchen counter, not long ago, with a nickel-sized burn on it. He swore that he didn't know how the top was damaged.
I didn't have the heart to tell him it could have been one of his kids, dared by another perhaps to heat a coin on the stove and flip it onto the laminate
countertop, "to see what would happen" . . .!

S


Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I had a small bachelor apartment about 50 years ago. The "kitchen," such as it was, consisted of a table for one, a 24" stove adjacent on the left, a metal cabinet on the right and a 'fridge across from the table. I could sit at the table, prepare and eat an entire meal (admittedly, not a culinary delight nor a Thanksgiving feast) without getting up. The sink was in the bathroom.

Children put the kibosh on a lot of things.


peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »


SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

These 360 photos are your work, tararubena ? Nice touring . . .

S

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