Windowsill Preservation Efforts

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ZeiglerHouse
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:08 pm

Windowsill Preservation Efforts

Post by ZeiglerHouse »

I want to know how to best preserve or care of the interior windowsills in a stairway that get a lot of afternoon sun. There is a lot of weathering and sun damage to the wood giving it a grey tone. I have spoken to a craftsman in town and he wanted me to see what knowledge everyone has about the finish that would have been on these in 1910. linseed oil? Wax? Please weigh in on what you all have done to preserve this wood by everyones homes or preservation experience.

Thanks!
p.s. I would post photos of I could figure out how to load them onto there from a j.peg

Alicia Harnois

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Alicia, I am always happy to help readers post photos here; I remember what it felt like to finally learn how to do that, and it didn't happen overnight !

You may email me your images, as jpegs, and I will place them here (or send you links so you may post them as you wish, which is the easy part).

One question readers will likely have is, what sort of interior finish was the house supplied with when new---or, more critically, what was the designer's intent as far as you know---and what finishes did you find when you acquired the residence ...

S

DRN
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Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Alicia.
You may want to reach out to John Waters at the FLW Building Conservancy as well. He is the Conservancy's Preservation Programs Manager and is always happy to speak homeowners like you and me to discuss preservation efforts...he knows a lot of people in the preservation world and has seen many ways to address different situations.

Best.
Dan Nichols,
Owner/Restorer/& very happy to live in and pull weeds at the J. A. Sweeton House, Cherry Hill, NJ

John can be reached via the FLWBC main line 312.663.5500

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

You might want to ask Waters about contacting Thom Gentle. He is a wood conservator who has had a long history with FLWBC. He helped Roland Reisley restore some wood pieces in his house.

SDR
Posts: 19321
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Alicia sends photos:


Image


Image . . . Image

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Wood doesn't like water. Any woodwork or furniture that is wetted would, ideally, be dried as quickly as possible. Dusting removes particles that can, in the aggregate, attract or hold moisture.


There is some evidence of wetting of the sash---but not of the sills, as far as I can see. The sash is absorbing condensation which coats the inside of the glass, in winter. One purpose of storm sash is to prevent this condensation.


S

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

Two issues you may want to consider:
It appears that you may be getting condensation on the inside of the art glass (not unusual) so you may want to consider purchasing INDOWS interior storms to place inside the windows during the winter months - the interior storms will help with the heating bills too!
I always recommend the use of tung oil (http://www.sutherlandwelles.com) for interior wood finishes, even though its different from Wright's original interior specifications. Tung oil restores the wood and provides protection over time. Feel free to call the president of the company, Mary Goderwis, and ask which products would work best - she is a big fan of FLW and is extremely helpful and knowledgeable.

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

INDOW makes a custom interior storm that is friction fit which makes them easy to install.

https://indowwindows.com/?utm_source=go ... gLgwfD_BwE
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'm happy to know about these interior "storm sash." Would they prevent condensation on the inside of the exterior glass ? I guess so---so that would eliminate one maintenance problem.

As such, I don't know that I'd worry about the present finish (or lack thereof) on the interior trim. Oiling couldn't hurt; how often would it want to be renewed, in a high-UV area with above-
average temperature swings ? If the wood remains dry, leaving it alone would be the simplest solution. I defer to the architects, in any event.



S

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Another sill at the Ziegler house, this one in the butler's pantry. This one has some finish on it.

It can't be denied that a film finish of any sort will make dusting easier, to say the least, and make spills easier to clean as well. Water standing on a film finish,
however, can get through and make spots---light-colored marks that require certain remedies to correct (mayonnaise is a popular one, believe it or not).


Image

ZeiglerHouse
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Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:08 pm

Post by ZeiglerHouse »

Thank you for all that info...Pual, do the storm windows stay in all year? We definitely have condensation that builds up during the cold months.

We do have some storm windows in the study of the room which were custom made, but we will have condensation that builds up in-between from what I can remember. Is that normal? I am a CA girl and I have never seen temp. swings like there is in KY. Apparently we have the most freeze and thaws out of any state in the country. Lucky us.

I will send Stephen a photo of the current storm windows in the study for an example.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Alicia writes:

"Condensation still builds up between these windows. They face east. You can see the wood is also well weathered on the actual window interior."


Image

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