Larkin Administration Building visuals

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David
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Post by David »

https://www.buffalorising.com/2016/12/h ... -the-past/

Interesting discussion in the comments

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Mr. Romero:

I am much more amazed at your ability to recreate so thoughtfully - and so beautifully - lost architectural treasures of the past.

Thank you for all of your hard work. And for sharing it all with us. It is greatly appreciated.


David

David
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Post by David »

Thanks David!

I love to know that my work can be useful in the open debate of rebuilding these masterpieces. When I started this project it was precisely because I wanted to visit these buildings that no longer exist, it would be wonderful to visit them physically someday, although I know that it takes more than just a few images for that.

I understand why the Larkin building is a very ambitious goal but the Pauson house or Ocatillo camp are quite affordable.

I wonder why nobody has thought of building the Pauson house as their own home, it is obvious that the market value would be considerable.

And as for Ocatillo camp, There's enough land near Taliesin West:

http://image.shutterstock.com/z/stock-p ... 738580.jpg

It would be a perfect complement to the visit. They can even charge the visit separately to finance it.

I think they recently built this model:

Image

They just have to go one step further and make it bigger!
Last edited by David on Sat Dec 24, 2016 6:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Heh-heh. Thanks, David. There's been discussion of the recreation of certain sites -- Midway Gardens would be another possible (if quite costly) candidate. What scares some is the possibility of a Disneyland atmosphere, with all that that suggests (Coke machines, parkings lots, a general commercial tone) -- and the certainty that a number of details would be inaccurately recreated or missing altogether.

Plimoth Plantation, and perhaps Colonial Williamsburg, come to mind as precursors. There are buildings at the latter which have been moved from their original locations, I believe, with other structures created from scratch, while at Plymouth (Massachusetts) everything is a hypothetical recreation -- no photographs exist of the original site(s) !

These attractions exist to inform the interested public of their national history. In this regard they perform the same function that would recreations of Wright sites . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

"Geeky"?! As FLW Himself said when Mike Wallace referred to him as an "intellectual": "I reject that accusation, and refuse to marry that girl." ... or words to that effect. Geeks we are not.

Matt
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Post by Matt »

When I was researching my physical model of Larkin, I was amazed at the interior. There were some spaces marked off my masonry walls that didn't reach the ceiling. So few photos exist that less attention has been paid to the interiors. I still don't know exactly how the penthouse level garden eating areas looked.

And when they tore the place down, what did they do with all the furniture?
[/img]

JimM
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Post by JimM »

Matt wrote: I still don't know exactly how the penthouse level garden eating areas looked.
[/img]

Matt.... maybe you've seen this from Quinan's book. Not a great photo.

Image[/img]


You don't see formal place settings (for the workers anyway) in employee lunch rooms these days. Silverware, ceramic tea pots..... where's the microwave?

The bricks from Larkin were used to fill the Ohio River Basin. The 24" steel I-beams that supported the 10" concrete floors went to West Virginia mines. Larkin was seriously vandalized over the years. The furniture was most likely stripped out long before demolition, along with 50 tons of copper & steel, every light fixture & doorknob.

Here's an interesting site, an ongoing Larkin Building project. Rendered furniture, lights, interiors....very nice work, but not the same caliber as James.

http://larkinbuilding.com/

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks for posting that photo, Jim. It's one of several interiors in that section of the book that I find interesting.

Those aren't chairs at the ends of each table. What are they ? Do they support something not present in the photo -- like the mid-desk raised platform in another photo on the previous page (81) ? Were they intended to contain lighting ?

On the two pages before that, we see a Lounge and a Library, also with amazing furnishings -- chairs in particular !

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Returning to the link at the top of the page, I find this, from the text:

"When I toured Fallingwater this year, they emphasized that it could NOT be built today, due to current codes. It would be a very different building."

Good to know that the realities of the work are being addressed by docents at Fallingwater.

As for recreating Larkin, the comments contain one delightful idea: that the world needs a Frank Lloyd Wright museum !

SDR

egads
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Post by egads »

It looks like the things at the ends of the table support the table top itself, eliminating the need for legs. It allows for eight chairs instead of the six a typical table that long would accommodate.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes. One wonders why they extend so far above the table top. Perhaps just to continue the containment offered by the chair backs -- or the line, at least ?

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Considering that the building was used as a department store in 1937, long before it was demolished (Quinan, page 125), the furniture had to have been removed long before vandalizing or demolition. Probably recycled.

The chairs in the lounge are early Barcaloungers (aka Lay-Z-Boy). The chair originated in Buffalo around the time of Larkin construction.

David
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Post by David »

This is the model I have made of this piece of furniture (used in my Larkin project):

Image

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thank you, David ! Is the single photo (above) your only source ? Well done.

I see only one questionable point: the horizontal (rail) beneath the cap of the leg element is perhaps too tall; note the difference when looking at its light-colored counterpart at the far end of the nearest table in the photo.

(Oh, yeah; can you make the grain of the back-rail run horizontally ?)

Now -- are your chairs modeled separately from the table ? Can we see one of those from the front and the side ?


Roderick, is that lounge chair really a standard La-Z-Boy (note sp.) product of the period -- untouched by Wright's restless hand ?

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

You can't get me to give that piano stool to Mr Wright . . . !


Image

"Frank Lloyd Wright's Larkin Building"; MIT Press; © 1987 by Jack Quinan

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