Outdoor lighting ideas for terrace?

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peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Outdoor lighting ideas for terrace?

Post by peterm »

Image

We have been enjoying the balmy evenings on the terrace at Lamberson this summer, but we can barely see our food, let alone each other! The existing down soffit lighting is simply not adequate to reach the dining area. (Our dining table is usually located toward the furthest corner of the terrace, which affords the best views and cooling breezes.) I'm considering connecting string globe lighting from the soffit to a branch on the honey locust tree which hangs above. I'm sure it will work fine, but am wondering if I'm overlooking a better (and possibly more Wrightian) solution? Did Wright wine and dine outdoors at the Taliesins?

Rood
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Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Outdoor Solar Table Lighting ... Here's one, available at Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com/Ambiance-Frosted ... able+light

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Here's an even prettier one . . . !

https://www.amazon.com/Tiffany-Style-Ou ... AW12MJM9JQ

Now, for something a bit . . . less . . . expensive:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013MC5AES/re ... B018RNSVLG

Modern seems hard to come by, in this category.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AUH3RNY?psc=1

SDR

DRN
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Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The solar table light is a workable, affordable, "green" solution, but the light can be a bit too cool in color temperature for dining. How about a "candlelight supper" with a candle in a simple windproof enclosure? A metal and glass kerosene lantern would provide more variable light levels, but it's styling may be too railroad nostalgic for the context.

egads
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Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

What about a spot downlight up in the tree pointing to the table. In the landscape lighting world that is called moon lighting. One hides a low voltage landscape cable going up the tree away from the view and then there is a strap like mount for the light. One would use a bullet style fixture with a deep shield. Here's a link to a company I have used a lot:

http://connect.voltlighting.com/t/l?ssi ... BIYY-dry5Q

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Beautiful. I forgot that we have a an experienced lighting person aboard . . .

I wonder if a solar-powered version of this idea is possible. A ground based collector, somewhere on the lawn beyond the tree, might be less costly than a completely concealed underground service from the house ? It could potentially power other tree-mounted lighting near the house. With LED lamps the power requirements must be quite low, now ?

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Where there is light, there are bugs. Best to locate the light away from the fillet of sole as far as possible.

Wiring the terrace for lighting seems unnecessary, and ultimately problematic, what with all the weather Iowa gets. Battery-operated lights or shielded candles would be better, paper sacks with turned down edges, a handful of sand and candles. They could be stored inside, and taken out for canoodling at dusk. Scented candles could give you a comforting aroma of bayberry wafting gently in the breeze.

Or try small LED flashlights that can stand on end along the terrace wall, covered by standard 6 to 8" globes that can be found at any hardware store.

egads
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Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

The problem with all the solar powered lights is color temperature and lumens (brightness) what I am proposing is low voltage, 12 volt landscape lighting that requires only a shallowly buried cable. I don't even like the new fixtures with integrated LED light sources. I do use LED lamps, but those I get to choose the color and beam spread. In this case, lighting a table from an adjacent tree I might select a very tight beam to have good light from far away. (Normally "moon lighting" would done with a flood for a soft effect)

So a transformer needs to be mounted and cable run. I bet someone even makes a triangle shaped path light that would be perfect around Lamberson. Now I'm going to have to look.

peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

I agree with egads regarding the harsh white, cool light of most LEDs. But aren't there warm white alternatives, even with some of the solar lights? It would be nice to not have to run cable.

I also like Roderick's idea of using flashlights and globes.

I definitely wouldn't be happy with the fake Wrightian table lamps.

egads
Posts: 892
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

There are LED candles. Cheap from Ikea. There are some really realistic ones that have a flat "flame" that moves.
So far I have not found any solar LED lights that are warm. They may be out there or coming. One issue with having them be solar is that they are not very bright so they will last. I have seen rechargeable lanterns, those are bright enough to be useful. Of course all of them will be Home Depot Tuscan taste wise. It's possible someone makes some in a more traditional railroad lantern shape. Also, an old kerosene lamp would work. For use in just the summer months, a light string would probably be fine. But those should have guy wire so there is no stress on the cord. And you are going to have to put a hook or eye into the side (or under the eve) of a collectible house.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Roderick's ideas are good ones. Start simple, and go up from there based on need. Yes, I can see how solar-powered lighting wouldn't have enough oomph to throw a beam 10 or 20 feet . . .

I was just hoping that Peter wouldn't have to have a hole drilled into the brick wall, sub-grade, joining another drilled through the slab, into maybe the living room, using an receptacle there, and maybe a remote-operated outlet switch (those are common) . . .

Happy warm summer nights in the midwest. Aaaah . . .

SDR

egads
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Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

Here are some links:

This is very nice, and price accordingly,

http://www.ylighting.com/smart-and-gree ... oCar_w_wcB

Here's a little table lamp,

http://www.designpublic.com/fatboy-edis ... h+-+fatboy

These folks have stuff to go with the previous owner's decor,

http://www.lanternnet.com/

Here is what I mean by flickering flat flame led candles,

http://www.target.com/p/action-flame-le ... lsrc=aw.ds

Of course having an umbrella would add some other possibilities.

I used this search term: rechargeable patio lights
To help weed out the camping stuff. There is more, including a cheaper version of the first link.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

In addition to being inexpensive, flexible and easy to store, the globe look would soften the angular geometry of the house. Triangular lights, I should think, would be the last thing you want in this instance. Cubes and rectangles wouldn't add a thing.

DRN
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Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

These guys might be available for a price...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... s_1908.jpg

KevinW
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Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Post by KevinW »

KevinW

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