Wright's Fontana Boathouse - new website

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Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Wright's Fontana Boathouse - new website

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I like the logo. The site is very neatly done.



Image

Image

jmcnally
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Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:23 am

Post by jmcnally »

A very artistic website, but modern websites remind me of books that are bound on two edges. You know how to find them and bring them to your desk, but it takes a while to figure out how to operate them.

When in doubt, just click and the site will guide you at its own pace.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Slide shows and other sequential pages are often operated by means of arrows placed at the right and left sides of those pages -- but they appear (or not) in a number of ways. Uniformity is an ideal only partially realized throughout the Web . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The web has a long way to go to outdo the old-fashioned book!

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

No doubt. But the convenience of surveying (portions of) the world's image library is hard to beat, and the ability to acquire the images with complete fidelity, for sharing, is not to be discounted, either.

The frustrations continue, of course. Things that worked fine yesterday suddenly go awry. At the moment my computer has decided not to recognize my longstanding user password, so I can't install the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. And the "help" available online, both from Adobe and Mac sources, is amazingly inadequate.

SDR

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

It would be very useful to me, for instance, to have the contents of my Taschen volumes available digitally. While I love seeing the large reproductions of some renderings and photos, most drawings are reproduced far smaller than is ideal. They would be more useful to me if I could move them around and study them in detail digitally, rather than in a large and unwieldy tome.

One is persuaded that the printed book is a thing of the past, when confronted with the Taschen set, for instance . . . as odd as that may seem.

SDR

Rood
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Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

"I had an idea that every house in that low region should begin on the ground, not in it as they then began, with damp cellars. This feeling became an idea also; eliminated the basement. I devised one at ground level. And the feeling that the house should look as though it began there at the ground put a projecting base course as a visible edge to this foundation where, as a platform, it was evident preparation for the building itself and welded the structure to the ground." FLLW Earth-line and human scale-- the sense of shelter, p 61. An American Architecture, c. 1955.

Unfortunately the Fontana Boathouse eliminated that projecting base course ... and for that the building suffers.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

What body of water is the boathouse built next to ? Is Lake Erie tidal ?

SDR

JimM
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Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

SDR, the Great Lakes are tidal just as an ocean, except the less volume of water minimizes the degree of tidal change.

The boat house is on the Black Rock Canal and closer to the mouth of the Niagara River than actually being on Lake Erie. Of course, heading North from Lake Erie the Niagara River eventually empties over Niagara Falls on it's way to Lake Ontario. The geologic history/formation of this area (the Niagara Escarpment) is quite interesting.

Rood
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Post by Rood »

Tidal? If Lake Erie were tidal it wouldn't have been necessary to build eight separate St. Lawrence Seaway locks between Buffalo and the Atlantic Ocean, which includes the locks that bypass Niagara Falls. If nothing else stands in the way of tidal action .... the Niagara Escarpment should do the trick.

The Fontana Boathouse is located on the eastern shore of Lake Erie, but along a miles long protected cove stretching south from Unity Island in the Niagara River. If you look closely at one of the photographs it's possible to see the long, narrow strip of land called Bird Island Pier, which helps protect the cove from high wave action and winter ice:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Water ... 78.8885072

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks, Jim. Now that you mention it, I recall seeing a very interesting PBS piece depicting the geology -- the number of miles the falls have traveled upstream over the last 10,000 years ? -- and even Olmstead's plans for intervention in the local landscape.

(Speaking of water levels, the standing level in my bathroom fixture, on the top floor of a six-floor structure on the side of a hill, drops reliably in windy weather. I'm awaiting an explanation from someone familiar with the plumbing in old buildings like mine. Will I hear about a vent-stack Venturi effect, perhaps ?)

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Rood, do I see a ramp in the photo above ? Does it descend, hinged, to a floating dock ? I can't make it out. Do those vertical nerfs beyond illustrate some tidal range, or isn't that their purpose ?

SDR

jmcnally
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Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:23 am

Post by jmcnally »

yes, we get tidal effects on the Great Lakes - but it's only a couple inches at its highest variation

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

So, the reason the new boat house is so far above the water is the local topography -- presumably.

SDR

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