Como Orchard and rustic Wright

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SREcklund
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Post by SREcklund »

SDR wrote: Image

all images © 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
If I'm reading this plan right, they had 1 bathroom to service 4 bedrooms plus the servant. Must have been a very close-knit bunch ... :D
Docent, Hollyhock House - Hollywood, CA
Humble student of the Master

"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright

SDR
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Post by SDR »

You may be too young to recall that this was, for the majority of the last century, the specification of the average American dwelling; granted, there were no servant quarters in most of them, after the 'twenties . . .

But it had to be pointed out to me that most of these Wright-designed shore cabins had no bathroom at all. The outhouses are never seen, even in early photos; might there have been communal bath-houses serving multiple cabins ?

SDR

Rood
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Post by Rood »

One bathroom to serve four bedrooms (plus a servant) in the turn-of-the-century farm homes I lived in, during my first six years, was one bathroom more than most houses possessed. Chamber pots beneath each bed served just fine, thank you, unless you wanted to brave 30 below winter weather on the way to the ubiquitous outhouses that lined the back lot lines of many houses in most small prairie towns. Sinclair Lewis had it right. Just around the corner was an ash-pile, moldering in the snow.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

To my eye, the spec sheet on the first page of this thread is in way a foreshadowing of Wright's later "systems based" designs for the ASB's, Textile Blocks, board and batten Usonian's, and the UA's. The rigidly gridded system of 4x4's and "panel" infill also brings to mind the Carlson, Fuller, and Penfield structures.

I'm intrigued by the specificity of the date on the drawing: April 10, 1909. I'm not familiar with Wright prominently noting the M/D/Y on drawings in this era. Is the date Wright left for Europe in 1909 known?

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

Secrest's biography suggests summer or fall:

"Wright and Mrs. Cheney made their plans with care. Sometime in the summer of 1909 she went to Boulder, Colorado, to visit a friend, taking her children John, aged seven, and Martha, aged three. Her husband had his suspicions, he said later, but did not believe them until he received a letter from her asking him to come and get the children. This version of events is contradicted by his testimony at the divorce proceedings, which was that she had left him in June of 1909 and had told him then that she did not intend to return. Cheney arrived in Boulder in early October to find that his wife was gone. She had met Wright in New York and had embarked for Europe." (p 203)

He also designed the Stewart house and the Copeland remodel , so he would have been at home a significant part of the year.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

One cold night, visiting my grandparents' farm, as I lay in bed, Oscar yelled up the stairs, "Roddy, do you want a pee can?" I said, "Yes." I thought he meant a nut.

SREcklund
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Post by SREcklund »

Roderick Grant wrote:One cold night, visiting my grandparents' farm, as I lay in bed, Oscar yelled up the stairs, "Roddy, do you want a pee can?" I said, "Yes." I thought he meant a nut.
Leave it to our Mr. Grant to put things into the proper perspective ... :-)
Docent, Hollyhock House - Hollywood, CA
Humble student of the Master

"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright

SDR
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Post by SDR »

When Roderick waxes poetic and reveals his wit, he is the stuff of legend: all too rare, and sorely needed.

SDR

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

I always like seeing detailed drawing about the construction of Wright's works -- especially notes on how they are to be built. Gives some insight into his engineering.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Many Usonian construction-drawing sheets contain large blocks of lettering, notes directed at the trades and/or describing construction details and specifications. When these are legible -- usually only by inspecting sheets at full size -- one can learn much about how the architect intended these houses to be built. Though the Foundation might be horrified at the prospect, it would be wonderful to see these published in some form -- as an aid to the understanding of Wright's profound iconoclasm, at the very least !

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Hanging on the wall above my computer is a detail sheet of the Hollyhock music room and entrance. Considering the scale and complexity of the house, it amazes me that it could have been built according to the working drawings, which are not at all clear, and have practically no measurements. Artistic, but not clear.

I also have a complete set of Freeman drawings. That house is smaller and simpler, and with the block system, a lot can be intuited. But it too leaves a lot to the imagination of the builder to fill in blank spots.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

I don't know if this has been posted before, but here's a link to a video concerning the Como Orchards Summer Colony. It's rather lengthy, but there may be some interesting things in it, such as current photos of some of the remnants:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVWpuf1 ... e=youtu.be

Tom
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Post by Tom »

RG: ... you have a complete set of Freeman drawings?! Damn.
Anyway we could get these on WrightChat?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Half-way through the Randall LeCocq lecture. Montana material begins c. 23:00.

It's a bit disconcerting to be shown the yellow-tinted winter rendering of Como Orchard Inn (see page 1) and to be told that this is one of the Wasmuth images . . .

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Wait until you get to the Pope Lehiegy (my sp stinks) House where he calls it a form of the modern ranch style.

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