Dwell Magazine article

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Ed Jarolin
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: Wyoming

Dwell Magazine article

Post by Ed Jarolin »

The November issue of Dwell contains an interesting article on

original owners still living in their Wright designed homes. The

Reisley, Christian and George Lewis House's are the primary focus with

brief mentions of Tracy and Rubin. The former three receive interior

and exterior photographic coverage as well.

Ed Jarolin
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: Wyoming

Post by Ed Jarolin »

Upon close inspection of the rendering of the Christian House accompanying this article, I note that the masonry appears to be

shown as desert rubblestone. If so, this was obviously changed

at some point to the brick that we see today.

This brings a couple of questions to mind. Other than the recently constructed Massaro, would this be the northernmost location for a design using rubblestone. It would seem this material wouldn't be particularly suitable in climates subject to freeze/thaw cycles.

The shuffling of materials seems fairly commonplace in Wright's work:

usually shifting to cheaper materials in the interest of economy. Stone

to brick, brick to block, etc. The only example I recall that went the

other way is the Pew House, which apparently was originally proposed

in brick and eventually built of stone.

Anyone out there with any info or comments they'd care to share?

Ed Jarolin
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: Wyoming

Post by Ed Jarolin »

Did a little research and can answer a least one of my own questions.

Both the Bott House and Chahroudi Cottage used desert rubblestone

in locations with hard winter weather. The question of unbuilt proposals

using the rubblestone method remains on the table. Also, how have

these stood up to the winter weather over the years?

RJH
Posts: 682
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:33 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Contact:

Post by RJH »

Don't forget Broad Margin located in a mild climate in Greenville, SC. Perhaps the poured masonary was not just for harsh climates....

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10303
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Chahroudi Cottage seems to be more concrete than stone in the kitchen and chimney which rise above the roof. There is a low wall beneath a very broad overhang that might have more stone. But overall the mix seems to be geared for the climate. It doesn't look like the dry mix called for at T West. Generally it is not a good material for freeze/thaw or even the kind of humidity found in the Carolinas. Massaro is not real desert masonry; it's just poured concrete with stone appliqu

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