Olfelt house for sale

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

Let's see -- Roderick asks the right question (or wasn't that a question): how much room is left over when the two cars he mentions are parked between walls 20 feet apart ?

'58 Buick Limited = 79.8"
'60 Pontiac Bonneville = 80.7"

Together they are 13'-3" wide. The space left over, divided by three, is 2'-3". That's just about enough to open the (thick and heavy) doors of either car -- not all the way, certainly -- and slip into or out of the car. It would help the paint jobs if those nasty "chrome"-plastic trim moldings were added to the door edges.

What if the owners had the sense to drive a Citroen DS 19 and a Mercedes 190 sedan ? Together those two cars would have occupied 11'-6", leaving 3'-2" of space between each -- eleven inches more than in the first example.

SDR

jmcnally
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Post by jmcnally »

Are we sure a carport of that size was designed for two cars? I'll bet two-car families were still scarce even in the prosperous 1950s.

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Roderick Grant wrote:Paul, 20' may accommodate two cars easily enough, but remember that this carport was designed in 1958 and built in 1960. Imagine if the Olfelts had a '58 Buick Limited and a '60 Pontiac Bonneville. They could stand side by side, but getting into and out of them would be a challenge at least, while the back end of the car toward the acute angel would hang out in the rain.
Roderick,
I don't live in the late '50s or early '60s. The problems you identified do not bother me since I live in 2016 which allows me the opportunity to purchase cars that would fit Mr. Ofelt's garage.

BTW: There were a lot of small cars available in the '50s. Maybe Wright told them to buy Crosleys.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

If he did, he hardly set an example.

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

In 1954's "The Natural House" Wright noted Nash as pruducing an economical car well suited for the long commute from a Usonian house to a job in the city. Nash built the small two seat Metropolitan and the small for the time Rambler.
The rest of the US auto makers introduced their compacts between '59 (Studebaker) and '60 (Ford, GM,& Chrysler) to compete with the European small imports (mostly VW, but also Renault, Simca, Citroen, Fiat, British Ford, M-B, and Opel...Japan was just beginning its rise on the west coast.

The majority of two car US families of the mid '50's to mid '60's owned a full size car and a smaller second car. I remember pre-school and kindergarten classmates in the very early '70's being dropped off by moms in big Ford LTD Country Squires and Buick Vista Cruisers (kids loved roof windows) while when dads did the deed, Falcons, Corvairs, and Beetles were seen.

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

A beautiful house from Wright's last year. And all of that furniture! How about those bar stools?
Last edited by peterm on Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

At one point, we had a 1950 Buick Roadmaster Riviera, a 1952 Oldsmobile Super 88, a 1950 Mercury Monterey and a Ford jalopy from the 30s. None of them were kept in the garage, which was full of junk and a flock of homing pigeons.

I recall the Nash Metropolitan; it was a horrid little car, about as capacious as a VW Bug. I once owned a '60 Bonneville. It had two Zip Codes.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

My high school art teacher bought a Metropolitan. She was unhappy when she discovered that she couldn't get snow tires for its tiny wheels. The drama coach, on the other hand, got a nifty Studebaker Lark hardtop coupe, turquoise throughout. Sweet.

SDR

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The barstools are unique....the whole kitchen seems to be. I have to assume this was by client request. Is this the only Wright kitchen of the '50's with space for eating after the Erdman prefab?

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Dewey Wright, Ablin and Lykes also have spacious kitchens. Boswell had a modest-sized galley kitchen (in its very spacious service wing) which has been significantly enlarged without doing damage to the design.

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

Fawcett has the biggest kitchen I can remember in a Wright house, because it needed to serve the crew two meals a day.

dtc
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Post by dtc »

A number of years ago my wife and I went to a wedding in Minnesota basically to take side trips to tour the Olfelt and the the 2 Lovness usonians. We enjoyed meeting Virginia and had a wonderful tour of her home studio and cottage. She is a real dear. Sorry to say we did not meet the Olflelt's and did not experience the interior of their home.
Virginia had a wonderful Pre Columbian ceramic collection on display through out the house.

All three houses were in excellent condition. I'm sure it had something to do with them being occupied by their original clients.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

One would have found neither Olfelt nor Olflelt listed at 2206 Parklands Lane . . .

SDR

dtc
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Post by dtc »

William Allin Storrer correctly spell it Olfelt.
Hess and Weintraub correctly spell it Olfelt

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

A search using 411.com found the Olfelts at the correct address.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

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