Article: Haynes House owner seeks de-listing

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Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The file of ten previous articles, linked at the bottom of the page, makes interesting reading for those trying to keep up with this saga.

SDR

Iowegian63
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Post by Iowegian63 »

"Along with his lawsuit, Herber asked the judge to appoint an attorney to represent him. He said he has tried to find a civil rights lawyer in the area, but none are willing to take his case."

So the takeaway of the story is that no lawyer will touch this with a ten foot pole.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Foreclosure?! Oh, no...

This is now the 11th article pertaining to the Haynes crisis.

jmcnally
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Post by jmcnally »

Iowegian63 wrote:"Along with his lawsuit, Herber asked the judge to appoint an attorney to represent him. He said he has tried to find a civil rights lawyer in the area, but none are willing to take his case."

So the takeaway of the story is that no lawyer will touch this with a ten foot pole.
Lawyers will take the case - they just won't take it for free. I don't think he has ever hired an attorney to handle the numerous lawsuits in the past.

He is also mistaken if he thinks the judicial system appoints attorneys for civil litigants.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The most efficient way to win friends and influence people is to kiss up.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

From the article:
With a low income, Herber said he spends most of his time receiving treatment for his disabilities at Lutheran Hospital, according to court documents.
According to court documents, the house was just pulled out of foreclosure by the federal Home Affordable Modification Program.
Herber claimed he had become disabled, could not afford repairs and said he might need to make external modifications to the house.
All very good reasons why RJH needs to sell his house. If he is physically or financially unable to maintain the house, he needs to sell it. Dragging this out will only lead to more costly deferred maintenance and a less attractive property to sell, and probably, a lower sale price. There is no rational need to continue this legal wrangling.

RJH's actions with the house until recently have indicated he respects the house as a significant work of architecture and that he supports its continued preservation. If he truly wants the house to be preserved, a preservation minded buyer is what he needs....a preservation minded buyer will not be taken aback by local historical designations with restrictions on exterior alteration. A buyer that is, is not a buyer that should have the house.

Market the house regionally (Chicago, Cleveland, Indianapolis) and nationally... put the listing on Wright For Sale. Price it reasonably based on what it is worth as a Frank Lloyd Wright house (a nice Fort Wayne house +?% premium), what has been added in terms of previously unbuilt furniture, and take into account what needs to be done by the prospective buyer as restoration when fielding inevitable offers below the asking price. It's a good house in a livable location, it will sell.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

There are 383 threads on Wright Chat which contain the word Haynes; Mr Herber posted to the site 690 times. I went looking for photos of furnishings which Herber and his father constructed for the house. I found many things, including a note from DRN in which he predicted that Sweeton would not receive a new roof for "fifteen or twenty years" . . . for example.

SDR

DRN
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Post by DRN »

...a note from DRN in which he predicted that Sweeton would not receive a new roof for "fifteen or twenty years"
Financially, I wish it had worked out that way. The increased rate of measured roof deflection in 2012-2013 ruled otherwise however.

Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

DRN wrote:and take into account what needs to be done by the prospective buyer as restoration when fielding inevitable offers below the asking price.
The entire window-wall, that comprises two walls in the living room, need to be completely rebuilt as they are very rotted.

Hopefully the new owner would hire DRN to consult on the rebuilt window-wall since he just did his.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Dan took what some would call fairly radical steps to restore the failing window wall at Sweeton; the work includes visible painted-steel "boots" to the bottoms of the existing painted softwood posts, and painted or stained sash and structural elements of the system contain a combination of original and new material, in a manner which, while neat and orderly, does not try to be completely invisible. A new rain-collection system further modifies, in a sensitive and sympathetic way, what was the original appearance of the house, while it enhances the functionality of the structure and ensures its future successful technical performance.

Deficiencies in the original specification and construction were identified and rooted out, resulting in a refreshed version of the residence. I'm sorry to know that the roof work, another thorough and commendable enterprise, had to be undertaken well ahead of schedule.

Other Usonians, those with a slightly better grade of original material, perhaps, have been restored with a bit more bias toward unchanged appearance and concealed restoration efforts. Dan C and the Dobkins residence is one example, where original mahogany sash stiles were sistered with matching material to replace deteriorated lower ends, in a way that's virtually unnoticed under a clear finish. A similar job, to the structural posts outside the kitchen, was accomplished at the Berger house, by Eric Berger. I expect that the clear-finished cypress posts at Haynes will have to be replaced in kind, and sash repaired or replaced as seems appropriate -- if this work has still to be done. Paul's statement to that effect is an unpleasant surprise.

We can be pleased that there are different kinds of Usonians, with differing levels of specification, including material and finish, to fill the catalog. Each instance, at least when it comes to restoration, is unique -- as is each restoration budget. And the Usonian catalog grows, if what I read today in Storrer is correct: In the listing for the Bernard Schwartz residence, we are told that Wright considered the LA block houses to be Usonian. Did we know that ?

SDR

pharding
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Contact:

Post by pharding »

SDR wrote:There are 383 threads on Wright Chat which contain the word Haynes; Mr Herber posted to the site 690 times. I went looking for photos of furnishings which Herber and his father constructed for the house. I found many things, including a note from DRN in which he predicted that Sweeton would not receive a new roof for "fifteen or twenty years" . . . for example.

SDR
That is because those threads are 15 to 20 years old. :D
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

DRN
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Post by DRN »

pharding wrote:
That is because those threads are 15 to 20 years old.
It just seems that long....I've been droning on about my efforts to purchase and restovate Sweeton since March 2007, 9 and a half years ago.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Well, I was lucky enough to have joined Wright Chat a few months before that, so that I could start the carping right from day one !

Be sure to mark your tenth anniversary in some way, Dan. It must be satisfying to know how much you've accomplished in your first decade in the house . . .

SDR

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