Frank Lloyd Wright and "Wendingen"

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Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Frank Lloyd Wright and "Wendingen"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/our-mos ... -wendingen

Exhibit: December 15, 2015–February 16, 2016
Ryerson and Burnham Libraries at the Art Institute of Chicago (open weekdays only)
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Would like to know more about the history of this book in terms of understanding Wright's "European reception."
Interesting to me how El Lissitzsky, a Russian Constructivist hanging out in Berlin, is chosen to design the cover of a Dutch publication. Wonder what all that was intended to convey?

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Good point.

Lissitsky left Russia for Berlin in 1921 and this cover was one of his first commissions there. He was already considered one of the most important figures in the avant-garde, so he would have been quickly welcomed. These European artists and architects all would have considered Wright to be extremely important, if not the most radical new architect on the planet.

Here we see a fantastic, rare international assembly: Russian Suprematism, Dutch de Stijl, German Bauhaus and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Macrodex
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Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Post by Macrodex »

Tom, check out FLLW v. America [ http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/026210 ... detailpage ].

It details a lot about Wright in Europe.

SpringGreen
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Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:00 am

Wright's reception in Europe

Post by SpringGreen »

Anthony Alofsin did an excellent extensive studies on this in Frank Lloyd Wright: the Lost Years: 1910-1922, a Study of Influence. That goes in depth on Wright's travels & what he was picking up. Alofsin also edited another book with a series of essays, Frank Lloyd Wright: Europe and Beyond, which will bring more information on how Wright's influenced trickled down.
"The building as architecture is born out of the heart of man, permanent consort to the ground, comrade to the trees, true reflection of man in the realm of his own spirit." FLLW, "Two Lectures in Architecture: in the Realm of Ideas".

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I would be interested to know what the reactions were to Wright's work, among the various modernist architects at the beginning of the second decade of the century. The Wasmuth publications are known to have had a strong and positive impact among many of them; were there any who favored a more abstract and unadorned kind of building -- who might have seen Wright's work as an advancement over what came before but not as the "last word," or even the "correct approach," to the future of the building art ?

Were the constructivist, of whatever nationality, fully on board, for instance ? Was there already a move toward what would become the Bauhaus movement ? No one man's work, no matter how wonderful, is likely to have been universally applauded -- wouldn't you think ? Was there a counter-trend underway in 1911 -- much less in 1921, when the first Wendingen publication on Wright appeared ?

SDR

SpringGreen
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Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:00 am

Post by SpringGreen »

Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier & Walter Gropius all worked for architect Peter Behrens when the Wasmuth was around & architectural historians have been puzzling out Wright's influence on them through the Wasmuth for decades.

Here's part of what Peter Blake wrote in The Master Builders: Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier:
https://books.google.com/books?id=4roPW ... th&f=false

The influence of the Wasmuth on these architects is mentioned in the Wikipedia page on it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasmuth_Portfolio

Undoubtedly there are more sources out there but I didn't have the time to look.

I don't know about the Constructivists because I get the sense Russians were more disconnected from modern art movements developing in Europe, in part because they didn't have the means/time to get to western Europe to absorb this stuff. Plus, I don't know the name of Suprematists of the top of my head (just Tatlin & that's only the Constructivist architect I remember).
"The building as architecture is born out of the heart of man, permanent consort to the ground, comrade to the trees, true reflection of man in the realm of his own spirit." FLLW, "Two Lectures in Architecture: in the Realm of Ideas".

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thank you. I have Blake's book, and will read it for further enlightenment.

I Googled "architectons (Suprematist architectural models)" and found a wealth of images. I also found this:

http://www.russianartandculture.com/art ... on-hewitt/

Last line: "Lazar Khidekel ‘built drawings and drew buildings,’ they say. ‘He always remained an artist.’" A man after our own heart.

From the Wiki page on the Wasmuth: " At the time of the portfolio's publication, three major influential architects of the twentieth century (Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius) were all working essentially as apprentices in the atelier of Peter Behrens in Berlin, where it has been said that work stopped for the day when the portfolio arrived."

Not for a week ? Maybe they were en charette at the time . . .!

SDR

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