Davenport Restoration Update - The Naked Horse

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Post Reply
pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Davenport Restoration Update - The Naked Horse

Post by pharding »

Tomorrow morning we start on the plaster mock-ups. We had the original plaster tested and we are reproducing original 1901 content of the plaster exactly. The sand will be the the exact size as the 1901 granules. They used horsehair for structural reinforcing in the 1901 plaster. We purchased horsehair for our mock-ups. If you see a naked horse in Northern Illinois, you will know that he gave his all to preserve FLW's legacy.



We finalized our plumbing fixture selections for the fourth time. This is it. There is no more time to change our minds again. We are using period reproduction fixtures. The toilets will be wall mounted tank type, toilets. They look historically wonderful. I just hope that for the sake of my marriage that they flush properly. The bathroom lavatory will be a console style period reproduction lavatory with porcelain legs and separate hot and cold water faucets. Unfortunately my wife would not buy into the claw-foot tub idea. She did appreciate my suggestion that she shower in the basement so we could get the claw foot tub. The tile will be custom made 3/4" tile with staggered joints and custom cove pieces. Another blow to the contingency.



My project architect/preservation specialist goes to Florida next week for the second time. When he went the first time for final inspection on the cut and dried cypress, all that they could show him was a log that was recovered from a river. One of the sales people accidentally sold our order and he didn't tell anyone. Hopefully the wood will be as they claim because we need it wrap up the exterior work so we can meet the drop dead deadline imposed by the village trustees. The deadline is December 7 so if you don't hear from me after that you can reach me through the River Forest Police Department. Or if we miss that deadline you also can reach me through my wife's divorce attorney. The pressure is on.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Mobius
Posts: 149
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2005 7:20 pm
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Contact:

Post by Mobius »

You certainly are going to extreme lengths here! Horse hair no less. GOOD LORD! I think you may have broken 17 state laws about naked horse Pr0|\|ography!



I know exactly what you are saying about the toilets. I swear, I have spent more time looking at, checking out, and inspecting damn toilet bowls than I have specifying a $60K kitchen for our new home. Mistakes with the kitchen are arguably forgiveable. Mistakes with the toilet are probably punishable by having weights tied to my legs, and thrown in the river.



Good luck!
How many escape pods are there? "NONE, SIR!" You counted them? "TWICE, SIR!"

*Plotting to take over the world since 1965

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Update

Post by pharding »

The mock-up was quite helpful. The outcome was not as planned however. We decided to bag the lime plaster and horsehair for the base coat of plaster. It was too difficult to work with and would have become unnecessarily expensive. We are going to stick with the tried and true gypsum plaster base coat without the horse hair. The horse will be grateful. We will use the lime plaster with limited horse hair for the 1/4" topcoat. We will also add more water for workability.



Mock-ups are critical to evaluate options in restoration in order to arrive at the desired results and to test the means and methods of construction. They also save time and money.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

JimM
Posts: 1551
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Re: Update

Post by JimM »

pharding wrote:The mock-up was quite helpful. .......

Mock-ups are critical to evaluate options in restoration in order to arrive at the desired results and to test the means and methods of construction. They also save time and money.


At least you tried. You might find it interesting that at the Martin House they have placed reinforced concrete "monoliths" 6 or 7' high on water tables, scattered around the work area for the pergola and and garage. They are used by the craftsmen if they need to work out something before doing the actual work. "Craftsmen" in this case are really good masons; Wright's specifications were surprisingly exacting even back then.



If you go before this phase is completed, look into their once a month construction tour, it's really worth it.

Post Reply