Perry house drawing

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Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

DavidC wrote:And here's an article that tells us that FLW's drawings "were almost all created by one woman, Marion Mahony Griffin". (see: about 1/3 down the page) David
Dave,
Interesting article. Which brings up the question... "Which of Wright's presentation drawings (drawn by whomever) have people in them?"

Off the top of my head I can picture a little girl with a yo-yo hanging over the rail at the Guggenheim. Are there others?

It seems like most of his most iconic drawings are devoid of people. To play amateur psychologist, maybe it is because people usually messed with his "art" by rearranging his furniture or interfering with his life, like Kitty and his kids.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Here are four drawings from the same period which I have found attributed to Lloyd. The vertical-line texture of the street in the A D German Warehouse sheet is notable. The arboreal foliage of the Sherman Booth drawing, derivative of Mahony's work, is far finer that that seen in the Perry drawing above.

Image


Image

Wood house, Decatur, IL, 1915


Image


Image

Sherman Booth project, 1911


Lloyd was an exceptional artist. As early as 1907 he was playing with foliage textures:

Image

Image



Speaking of foliage, here are two more images, one of which is credited to Harry Robinson (HR). Frank Lloyd Wright: Architect (MoMA, 1994) is the source; the German Warehouse view above is also found there, uncredited as to delineator. Oddly, the volume does not include Lloyd in its list of 22 drafters.

Image

Image
Last edited by SDR on Fri Mar 27, 2015 9:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Matt
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Post by Matt »

Did Lloyd do most of the Wasmuth portfolio? That drawing of the Booth how is what started my fascination with Wright.

SDR
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Post by SDR »


SDR
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Post by SDR »

Paul, late drawings of the Guggenheim interiors are stuffed with people, including the little girl. But you're right that many Wright view drawings do not include figures. It is the photographs which are notably without such figures, so that the view of the Coonley house with a small child stands out.

SDR

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

The foliage-style on the bottom harkens Marion, to me.

I'm reminded of her rendering of the DeRhodes house, was it? where she included MM tucked by the foliage.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes, and this drawing includes a scale figure. The tree-foliage textures are interesting and may be a source for Harry Robinson in his Bock Studio view.

Perhaps the Sherman Booth drawing is by Mahony after all; the circular flower blossoms are like the ones here. Would she have been available in 1911 ? Was the Booth house designed before Wright decamped, or later ?


Image DeRhodes, 1906

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Paul Ringstrom wrote:Which of Wright's presentation drawings (drawn by whomever) have people in them?
SDR - didn't we have a thread not too long ago where you (and others?) posted specific drawings/renderings that had people in them???

I tried looking w/ our fabulous 'search' feature - but came up empty.


David

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I'm looking now. Not sure I recall that thread, exactly. In the meantime, I still like the figures and other entourage in this drawing by Francis C Sullivan:

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewtopic.php?t=4270


And here's some useful stuff on the content of the Wasmuth Portfolio:

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewtopic.php?t=7420


SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

SDR, the floor plan you posted on page 1, dated 1890, was probably done earlier; it's the plan of the house above FLW used as his entrée to LHS done in 1888.

People in perspective drawings: Wolf Lake Amusement Park; Lexington Terrace Apartments; Larkin Bldg. exterior; Larkin Co. Pavilion; Unity Temple exterior; De Rhodes; Press Bldg.; Kehl Dance Academy; San Diego Movie Theatre; Lake Geneva Inn; there's a car approaching one image of San Marcos in the Desert - I assume a person is driving; Little Dipper; Tahoe Summer Colony (with a parasol); National Life Insurance; S. C. Johnson exterior; Monona Terrace; Crystal Heights; Kalita Humphreys; Broadacre City ... all the way up to Donahoe Triptych in 1959. Admittedly, some of the distant views of large-scale buildings reduce the people to squiggly bits, but people they are.

It's not uncommon for architectural drawings and photographs to be devoid of life. With FLW's work, the need to set a scale is especially important.

There are two photos of Coonley with "little Miss Coonley looking like Alice in Wonderland," one standing by a tree in the yard west of the dining room, and one kneeling on the terrace, peering into the reflecting pond, both taken before the remodeling of the living room façade. FLW had her edited out of the former, replacing her with bark.
Last edited by Roderick Grant on Sat Mar 28, 2015 3:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

On the subject of humans in Wright drawings:

There are two drawings for Lamberson, one depicting the house in winter, the other summer. The winter drawing shows a couple standing, presumably Jack and Alice Lamberson, peering out through the living room windows, icicles hanging from the edge of the roof, toward the view down the hill in the direction of the artist's vantage point. The summer rendering shows the same couple standing outside a few feet away on the terrace, again gazing as if happily greeting the delineator.

Of course, one of the main advantages of showing the human form in an architectural perspective drawing is to illustrate scale and show the client the apparent size of the house. (And it surely would have been exciting to imagine themselves being the central actors in the theatrical production...)
Last edited by peterm on Sat Mar 28, 2015 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

That's a rarity, surely . . . !

Thanks, Roderick; I failed to read carefully the page I took that Cooper image from:

http://www.samara-house.org/froebel05.htm

Taschen I has a large reproduction of the plan drawing (with elevation of "barn") . . .

SDR

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

SDR - I was confused. This was the thread I was thinking of.

It has various renderings w/ people in them but the thread itself was about interior perspectives.


David

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