Video:FLW Fellow & ephemera on Antiques Roadshow

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DavidC
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Video:FLW Fellow & ephemera on Antiques Roadshow

Post by DavidC »

(this was brought to my attention by a fellow Wright Chatter):

Austin, TX | Hour 1

(the segment begins at the 35:52 mark - and continues to 38:36)


Can anyone help identify this particular apprentice? He arrived in 1953 - and worked on the Guggenheim.

According to John Geiger's list <---- (pdf file), those arriving in 1953 (and not already listed as "deceased" on his list) included:

- Aederi, Raja
- Amery, Nezam K
- Anderegg, Ernst
- Banks, James
- Bogart, Paul
- Devenney, Nick
- Gorman, Robert Saul
- Goss, Robert ("Gunner")
- Graves, Clint
- Harding, John
- Jones, Jean Cameron
- Nestor, Julius
- Nyland, Eric
- Ottenheimer, John
- Puttnam, Anthony
- Rodriguez, Manuel
- Roland, Ralph
- Thomas, Robert
- Wheatley, David C
- Wierl, Reinhold


Also, any idea what project the original FLW drawing is of???


David

Randolph C. Henning
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Post by Randolph C. Henning »

I've been told it was David C. Wheatley.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Thank you, Randolph.

David Wheatley


David

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

(via PriarieMod):

Here is a link to a few pictures of the Elizabeth and Robert Warren Home (1963) that is attributed to David Wheatley. The home (in St. Joseph, MI) was on the tours that were part of 2013 FLW Conference, based in Grand Rapids, MI.

And here is a link to a discussion of a home (Donald W. Aitken House) that was for sale back in 2006 - and that 'wjsaia' mentions as being another David Wheatley design.


David

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

SDR - would you be able to take a screen shot of the original Wright drawing - possibly blow it up a little - and post it here? Thanks!


David

Randolph C. Henning
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Post by Randolph C. Henning »

The original drawing "borrowed" (and yet to be returned) by David Wheatly featured on the Antiques Roadshow is a sketch for the Edgar J. Kaufmann Farm Cottage at Fallingwater. Per BBP, the project dates circa 1941.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Thanks, again, Randolph.

In the video, Mr. Wheatley says "I was cleaning up the drafting room after (Wright) had already gone. And I saw this and I thought well, my God - they take them off and throw away. So I thought, what the heck. So I took a razor and cut that out and kept it."

And later he says, "And if I left it there it would have just be thrown away."


Intentionally or not (you never know due to editing by the program producers), Mr. Wheatly comes off sounding as is he all but 'rescued' this 'soon-to-be-thrown-away' sketch by Wright - who just happened to just 'shake another one out of his sleeves' in front of the apprentices (who would then make final drawings from it).

One problem is, Mr. Wheatley arrived in 1953 and - assuming Randolph's BBP date is correct - the drawing was done in 1941. Therefore, it had been sitting in the drafting room for a minimum of 12 years. Also, Mr. Wheatley mentions that he took a razor to cut it out. That would imply that the sketch had been specifically put into or onto something (frame and/or backing) prior to being set aside.

Also, by the mid-50's hadn't Taliesin started the process of beginning to save and catalogue drawings and related items?


David

DRN
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Post by DRN »

Wheatley's comments seemed odd to me too.

Given the vast number of drawings in the Archive, it would seem little was just thrown out. The sketch appears to be a clear preliminary sketch of a plan and elevation for a concept that, based on its form and organization, has similar characteristics of later houses including the Erdman Prefab#1 and the Sweeton house. I could see this being out of the drawer as a referential sketch for one of those projects in the 1950's....but I find it difficult to imagine the keepers of the drawings would let such a sketch be tossed once it spawned another design.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Image

Image

Farm Cottage Project, 1941 -- possibly proposed for a site near the Kaufmann's dairy barn, east side of Route 53. Three-foot module. Illustrations found on pp 124-127 of Merchant Prince and Master Builder (Richard L Cleary, 1999).

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewtopic.php?t=2991


Drawing exhibited by Mr Wheatley:

Image

Image

Image

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Thank you very much for posting these, SDR. It gives great illustration to just how close to 'finished' Wright's designs could be coming straight from thought-to-pencil-to-paper.

The Kaufmann Farm Cottage design seems to have a lot in common with the Edith Carlson House (1939) and related Roy E. Petersen House (1941) - which was realized as a Legacy Project in the form of the Whiteford-Haddock House (1979) - Ann Arbor, MI.


David

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