Presentation drawings

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Macrodex
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Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Presentation drawings

Post by Macrodex »

Does anyone have anymore presentation drawings? I found this one last night. Looks -- of course -- far cleaner than typical perspectives.

Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Do you mean drawings of this project -- or uncolored perspective views of any commission ?

SDR

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

Any commission.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

So, you like the "unrendered" line drawing ? Yes, I do too. The automobile in this view might identify the delineator. The foliage too, though I don't recognize the hand.

SDR

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

The line drawing looks clean -- and it's an angle I haven't seen of that project - which I, also, enjoy finding.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Here are seven line drawings.


Image


Image Larkin


Image


Image


Image Willey I


Image


Image

Rood
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Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

When I was in college the Lutheran Campus Center (of all places) had a wonderful small booklet of ink drawings of some of Mr. Wright's work. I especially remember a sketch of the Automobile Objective in Maryland, which was particularly striking ... the large, rugged boulders on the site indicated merely by a few carefully chosen lines.

I've always regretted not having lifted the booklet. God only knows what happened to it. I've never found one like it anywhere.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yeah, I can relate. I went back to a favorite used book store several times and thumbed through a little pamphlet catalog of some of George Rickey's
early work. Finally it was gone -- and I've regretted ever since not having it when I had the chance.


I think it's a real shame that, after all this time, we know as little as we do about who drew the drawings that emerged from Wright's succession of
studios. It would be so great to be sure about what his own work was like, as distinguished from that of his sons and from the many talented drafters
who were with him at various periods.

The last volume of Taschen The Complete Works contains a page of text about the drawings. I'm going to review it and post relevant portions --
or the whole thing, if necessary -- as an aid to understanding.

SDR

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

The Adelman Laundry Proj. was always interesting to me. It has some nice forms going on with it.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Again, we go back to Geiger. Although there were plenty of drawings that he could not identify, he tried to list who did what at least as far back as the Fellowship.
So it depends on when his archives become available.

Marion Mahony's work is typified by the landscaping -- flowers, vines, birdies.
A prime example is the De Rhodes House, as is the Petit Memorial Chapel above.

Geiger identified Lloyd as the drafter of the famous view of A. D. German Warehouse and the ASBH series.

Can't recall off-hand, but the name of the producer the chiaroscuro drawings in the 1920s is well known.

Davy Davison did the night views.

FLW, Himself, often added his own bits and pieces to drawings done by others, like Howe.
The trees on the Chi Sigma Chi drawing above look a lot like his work, though I think it actually is not.

For books I regret not buying, "Pontius Pontifex" told the story of the design and construction of the San Francisco Bay Bridge.
Not that this is the greatest bridge, but the book was beautifully done ... but pricey.
Last edited by Roderick Grant on Fri Jan 16, 2015 12:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Macrodex
Posts: 236
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Post by Macrodex »

Roderick Grant wrote: FLW, Himself, often added his own bits and pieces to drawings done by others, like Howe.
One example I can recall is in the Point View Residence rendering. He added steeper cliff lines to the drawing to make it look more dramatic

Image

The bottom is cropped out showing the full perspective, but you can make out some of it.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I don't find a change in the way the building meets the ground in the Point View project drawing. Perhaps you are thinking of the Ayn Rand project ?

Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Of the delineators who started with Wright, Lloyd produced perhaps the most impressive body of work. John Lautner, on the other hand, could
barely draw, to hear him tell it. In addition to his other charms, Rudolph Schindler had a nice way with the pencils.

The only commonly available volume to include identification of the drafters responsible (for less than half of the work illustrated) is the 1994 tome
which accompanied the MoMA Wright exhibition of that year. The book is titled Frank Lloyd Wright: Architect. Twenty-three names are included
in the list:

Allen Davison
Aaron G Green
A Louis Wiehle
Antonin Raymond
Birch Burdette Long
Blaine Drake
Emil Brodelle
Frank Lloyd Wright
George Cronin
Herbert Fritz
Heinrich Klumb
Harry Robinson
John H Howe
Jon Rattenbury
James Thomson
Kameki Tsuchiura
Marion Mahoney [sic]
Peter Berndtson
Robert Mosher
Rudolph M Schindler
Takehiko Okami
Vladimir Karfik
William Drummond


Few presentation drawings credited to FLLW are shown; all pieces by him prior to 1911 are pencil studies or detail drawings. The first finished and
colored presentation view ascribed to him is the 1911 Goethe Street Studio project, and further colored view drawings occur during the teens and
twenties, including two impressive views of Textile Block commissions. He and Jack Howe are credited with one of the classic colored-pencil views of
Fallingwater and of the red-pencil views of Jacobs I as well as colored perspectives of Lewis and Pew. Further co-credits follow . . .

SDR

Macrodex
Posts: 236
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Post by Macrodex »

No, I mean Point View. I considered it was the Rand Cottage at first, but then I saw the PV perspective.

In Frank Lloyd Wright Drawings: Masterworks from the FLLW Archives, pg. 78, it's noted that FLLW added lines to the cliff to accentuate the drama of the setting. You can see it in the full perspective -- which I didn't post.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Image

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