New Book on The Pope-Leighey House

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Tom
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Post by Tom »

This is as good a place as any to post this question.
Just wondering and thinking that I remembered something about train travel having an influence on Wright. Didn't he say something about the "miniaturization of the future" because of this influence ... I can't remember.
Anyway I was inside an older passenger car recently and thought this experience could well have influenced the Usonians, anything documented on this?

...having difficulty posting the link.
Google: "building Lincoln's funeral car"

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


Rood
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Post by Rood »

Tom wrote:This is as good a place as any to post this question.
Just wondering and thinking that I remembered something about train travel having an influence on Wright. Didn't he say something about the "miniaturization of the future" because of this influence ... I can't remember.
Anyway I was inside an older passenger car recently and thought this experience could well have influenced the Usonians, anything documented on this?
Yes. Mr. Wright was particularly impressed by the efficiency of the kitchens on passenger trains .... everything snug and handy without the cooks having to make unnecessary to-and-fro movements. He attempted to duplicate those efficiencies in the Usonian "Workspace".

I believe he was also influenced by the efficiency experimental work of the Frank and Lillian (Cheaper By The Dozen) Gilbreth family at the turn of the century.

See: http://en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Lillian_Moller_Gilbreth

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Professional cooks also prefer small kitchens to save walking around. Send the kids to their rooms to do their homework, and get rid of the center island.

Unbrook
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2005 11:19 am
Location: Lakewood, Ohio

Pope-Leighey

Post by Unbrook »

I am intrigued with the landscape plan for the house. Is the a resource for a larger picture of the plan? Are there any plans to recreate the landscaping?

I remember when the house was at the original location on Woodlawn Plantation, mention was made of the semi circular garden at the rear of the house, but hadn't heard anything about it after the last move.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Never heard of Gilbreth before. Amazing and the source for "Cheaper by the Dozen"! Who knew? Love Wright Chat. Thanks Rood.

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

The plan in Taschen shows the round garden in-plan.

Image

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

As currently sited the approach to the house is unfortunate. One walks down on it from above approaching toward the corner of the kitchen and study. The first thing you see is the back side, the roof, and galvanized vents.

Unbrook
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Location: Lakewood, Ohio

Pope Leighey

Post by Unbrook »

Thanks for the larger view of the garden. From the original post, there appeared to be another garden area just below the last image posted. Is there more to the image?

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The plan posted above was the first proposal, which was not built for cost reasons. The plan as built was smaller, and the circular garden was deleted. It's obvious that FLW was disappointed that the house was not built as originally planned; "The Natural House" includes the photos of the house as built, but the plan and perspective are of the larger version (pp 143-6). Storrer shows the plan as built (S 268).

When I saw P/L on a Conservancy trip, the ladies who show people through the plantation mansion (which tour we did not take) seemed puzzled that we would want to visit Pope/Leighey.

Unbrook
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Location: Lakewood, Ohio

Pope Leighey

Post by Unbrook »

I thought the approach was corrected when the house was moved the second time.

You really aught to go through Woodlawn Plantation. It is a lovely building with terrific views. You can almost feel back in the 1700's. I applaud them for the decision to allow Mr. Wright's house to be a part of their campus. The house as a plantation has an interesting history. It was built for the niece or grand daughter of George Washington (Mount Vernon is not far away) and had a fairly liberal policy of housing freed "slaves" after the War Between the States.
(Or so I remember reading).

I recall a group of docents from the Pope-Leighey house visiting the Weltzheimer/Johnson house and remarking that all of our screw heads were not horizontally oriented. We haven't had the experience of being de-assembled and re-aasembled two times!

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »


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