Bachman house by Bruce Goff for sale

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Sequoia
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2011 3:31 pm

Bachman house by Bruce Goff for sale

Post by Sequoia »

Interesting house, I was always interested in viewing the interiors.


www.estately.com/listings/info/1244-west-carmen-avenue

peterm
Posts: 6293
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Oy vey...

Sequoia
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2011 3:31 pm

Post by Sequoia »

peterm ,your construction photos are tidier than this attempt at marketing. Once you look past the clutter you can see part MCM, part 1900 era farmhouse. Looks like the remodeling could go a few steps further.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10615
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Oof da fida! Beyond the clutter is an uninteresting house.

DRN
Posts: 4055
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Photos like this do no one any good. If marketing is the aim while the house contents are actively being sorted and settled, it would be key to focus on the interesting feature areas, move the clutter to another space and get the shot, and repeat elsewhere as needed. A house like this should be marketed by an ArchitectureForSale sort of agent who could get it to the attention of those who appreciate MCM in general, or Goff in particular. The result would be a piece of architecture not being marketed as a tear down or oddity, a new owner with an interesting house with history, and a better sale price for the estate heirs....win,win,win.

I would have to believe the Goff Archive at the Art Institute of Chicago has some period photos of the project in its collection. Goff had the exterior views of the house published; it is highly likely he had some interior pics made as well. The project was important to Goff...enough that he included it in his lectures as late as 1980-81. I'm not sure of the status of the neighborhood, but I would think this would "clean up well" as a great house for the right owner.

clydethecat
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 8:29 pm

Post by clydethecat »

Mein Gott in Himmel!

Sequoia
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2011 3:31 pm

Post by Sequoia »

I'm not sure about tear down potential because of its landmark status. As far as neighborhood is concerned it is in an excellent area ( Andersonville ). Close to restaurants , entertainment , train and the lake. I've driven by many times, it really adds architectural diversity to the community.

SDR
Posts: 20293
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Isn't this a Goff exterior pasted onto a conventional residence ? What is there of interest within the walls ? Only a diehard Goff fan would make a pilgrimage to see this building and check it off the list -- as I see it. And, no, I'm not much of a fan !

The messy rooms can't hide the fact that there's no "here," here.

SDR

DRN
Posts: 4055
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The house was live/work house for a recording engineer. Goff designed a small recording studio in the house pre-war, and a later more comprehensive program of additions and exterior alterations post-war. From what I have read, the budget was tight and most of the interior work focused on the first floor with second floor receiving only the diamond windows and finish alterations. The following is a description from the Chicago Landmarks application:
The Myron Bachman House Remodeling

One of Bruce Goff s most unusual commissions came in 1947 when he was engaged to plan the remodeling of an existing frame house for recording engineer Myron Bachman. Unlike commissions for new residences where Goff was relatively unrestrained in evolving his designs, the Bachman project required him to work with an existing nineteenth century frame structure, and execute the remodeling program at a moderate cost. The resulting project reflected Goff s creative resourcefulness in adapting existing conditions through the use of unlikely materials and technologies.

Myron Bachman and his family had lived since 1942 in a modest two-story frame dwelling in the Uptown neighborhood. The house had been built sometime before 1889, the year the village of Lake View was annexed to the city. With its gabled roof, clapboard siding, and enclosed front porch, the Bachman house was typical of the closely-spaced late nineteenth century houses of the immediate area. A commercial recording engineer, Bachman had engaged Goff in 1942 to plan a small recording studio within his house, and after the war commissioned a more extensive remodeling of the property. Early in 1947, drawings were prepared in Goff s Norman, Oklahoma, office to expand the house to create additional living quarters for the Bachman family, a new recording studio, and an extensive reworking of the exterior and interior finishes. Construction was started in 1948, and finished in the same year.

Except for the pitch of the gabled roof, the exterior of the remodeled residence bore little resemblance to its original appearance. Adapting the materials and technology from World War II quonset hut construction, Goff clad the roof and exterior walls with a shimmering skin of corrugated aluminum. The aluminum was applied directly over the existing materials, and detailed to create the maximum visual effect with minimal expense. As an example, the projecting eaves on the gable ends of the original house were covered over with angled pieces of corrugated aluminum which tied into the face of the house, contributing to the prismatic qualities of the facade. The windows were extensively changed, the most dramatic alteration being the replacement of the second-story windows on the south and east elevations with a large diamond-shaped windows with irregularly shaped casement sash. was provided by redwood louvers, extending from the top of the windows to the peak of the roof. Aluminum ridge projections on the gable faces suggest Japanese influences and unifies the varied planes of the facades and roof.

On the first floor, the house was extended to the street and to the east with a masonry addition of pinkish common brick, given texture by the heavy application of extruded mortar. The addition created a new entry to the house and studio, a windowless skylit control room for Bachman' s recording facilities, and an expanded living-room which also doubled as the studio itself. A garage with corrugated aluminum doors was also provided on the front facade, a practical necessity since the property had no alley access for a rear garage, Although many of the interior partitions of the original house were left in place, the finish and trim were completely changed. Goff s plans called for sandblasted wood doors and trim, and the interior decoration was carried out in shades of pink and silver, reflecting the materials of the exterior. Other new amenities added for the Bachman family were a kitchen and breakfast room at the rear on first floor, and a combined family room and guest bedroom above.
Like many of Goff s projects, the unorthodox character of the Bachman remodeling attracted much attention in the neighborhood and the city at large, and was featured in a full page photo-essay in the Chicago Daily News.

Drawings for the Bachman House remodeling indicate that the masonry walls were originally to be of yellow stone with black mortar joints, but were changed to common brick prior to construction. The second floor windows were also modified in execution.
Based on the description given in the quote, it would appear from the pictures that the Goff interior color and finish selection have been muted by white paint, and it would be necessary to review the construction drawings in the Art Institute's Goff Archive to ascertain what plan changes may or may not have been made since 1948. I would imagine the historical significance of the house is more the exterior alteration than the interior function, which would facilitate a new owner's alterations within and a restoration of the exterior. Goff's concept of a skylighted space on a tight lot would seem to be a nice feature worth retaining and enhancing.

peterm
Posts: 6293
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

The exterior of the house alone and the neighborhood of Andersonville combine to make the house an interesting option for a potential buyer.

It contains many of the ideas expressed in Frank Gehry's own Santa Monica house, but anticipating it by 30 years:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gehry_Residence

And... Schindler from the 1940s:
http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/features ... p3-6-2.asp

DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »


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