Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

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josquin
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Location: Los Angeles

Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by josquin »

The Jardinette Apartments Today. I find it remarkable the Jardinette Apartments still exist, but there they are; a testament to Neutra's vision.

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2014/04/r ... 1.php#more

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Check out Neutra showing off his erasing shield.



Roderick Grant
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by Roderick Grant »

This building has been in the dumps for decades. The neighborhood along Western is not good, and it would be hard to get the kind of rent needed to justify extensive restoration. It would probably be necessary to secure government funds to subsides rent. But it is eminently worth saving, at least from a cultural standpoint, if not a financial one.

JimM
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Location: Austin,Texas

Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by JimM »

Interesting that according to the 1950 Schumann photo in the article, Schindler did not intend the "step up" detail at the corner windows to be painted a different color than the wall plane. All corners have the same treatment, but only the corner section Schumann details has the "step up". Anyone know what was original?

SDR
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by SDR »

Yes, that is odd---odd of Neutra to change that strong and definitive detail, from one part of his building to another ?

The Julius Shulman photo is handsome, and that Chevy panel van is a rare bird. We recall that Neutra gave Shulman his first commission as an architectural photographer. https://socalarchhistory.blogspot.com/2 ... -1936.html

S

JimM
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by JimM »

Stephen-still had Schindler on the brain from yesterday! 🙄

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by SDR »

Heh-heh. That's okay; you weren't too far away . . .

I'd love to see a group show of Neutra's and Schindler's renderings and other drawings. I continue to be tickled by Neutra's initials on this pre-Fellowship drawing of the Textile Block system:Image

On page 242 of Monograph 4 a white-on-black image of this drawing, including titling in German and measurements in centimeters, is reproduced with this explanation: "The block system as shown in the drawing below with German text was prepared for the book Frank Lloyd Wright, by H. de Fries, published in Berlin by Ernst Pollack, 1926." The cast block pattern is nearly identical to that of the Ennis house. The version shown here was included by Mr Wright in "The Natural House," 1954. Mr Wright can be credited with leaving Neutra's initials intact, in both versions of the drawing.

In the Monograph no index number is given to the German-language version of the drawing; Taschen also reproduces it, in color (it turns out to be a cyanotype---a blueprint) and with the erroneous [?] number 2111.001.

S

Reidy
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by Reidy »

I'm curious about the date. In 1927 he was in joint practice with Schindler. Was this building at least nominally the product of their office? The pool / terrace that occupied what would have been the site of the Little Dipper is nominally their work, but everybody calls it The Schindler Terrace.

SDR
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by SDR »

What work---built or not---bears both their names ?

S

Reidy
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by Reidy »

The story is that they sent the League of Nations design to Neutra's father-in-law in Switzerland as a joint work and that he took Schindler's name off before submitting it formally. Nothing too good for his little girl.

SDR
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by SDR »

That's what I read---somewhere. It doesn't seem to be in Gebhard---though he reports that many drawings of the League of Nations project are Neutra's work but Schindler did a lot of preliminary sketches, and that different parts of the project reflect each of their tendencies.

So, their collaborations began with Neutra doing landscape plans for Schindler houses---How, and the Lovell beach house---and then, between 1926 and 1931 under the rubric of AGIC (Architectural Group for Industry and Commerce), and joined by the urban planner Carol Arnovici, they designed an "amusement center" and cafés, hotels, and apartment houses. "Their largest planning schemes were for the Falcon Flyers Country Club, near Wasco, the auditorium and civic center art Richmond, and a series of 'highway bungalow hotels' (no locations given, signed only by Schindler and Arnovici). Not one was built" (Gebhard). He suggests that Neutra's presence may have "encouraged Schindler to rid himself of his bag of fussy Wrightian details which he still used on occasion. The cleaned-up machine-like quality of Schindler's buildings of the thirties, his increased use of hard, non-tactile materials, and his rejection of 'warm' materials, especially wood, during much of his de Stijl phase of the thirties probably owed much to the stimulus of Neutra."

Interesting. On the other hand, he wrote somewhere that he was not happy with stucco: "An inorganic and rigid material applied over an organic wood frame which moves with the weather and the seasons"---or the like. It's interesting as well to read of the Richmond, CA projects; this might explain a lone house by Schindler on the San Francisco Bay shore at Richmond, far north of most of his work.

S


Reidy
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Re: Curbed LA Looks at Richard Neutra's First Commission

Post by Reidy »

Sweeney discovered a Schindler remodel in Stinson Beach that was not in Gebhard's catalog:

(Most of the pictures wouldn't display for me, and the realtor links are obsolete.)

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