Sweeton Window Wall and Roof Resto/Rehabilitation

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DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

With the steel set, the roofing can now be replaced. The roofing contractor had a delay which allowed the carpenter and me time to study the existing roof (or obsess over, as Christine likes to call it). The new roll roofing and battens will accentuate any undulation in the roof plane...to that end we are "touching up" a few bends and depressions in the roof minimize "batten bowing".


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Though the carport is supported by 2 large I-beams, the roof framing is all 2x10's and 2x6's which have twisted downward a few inches toward the west front of the house. This twisting has lifted the framing and sheathing over the entry area causing an "arch" in the fascia. Following temporary shoring/leveling of the carport/porch roof, we will add a 40' long flitch plate to the double 2x6 fascia beam to act as a splint to reduce the arching as much as possible.


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The rake overhang at the south workshop roof droops a little. It's framing was not originally done as outlookers let into the rafters behind the exterior wall...it was just framed as a continuation of the rafters. A salvaged white oak barn beam was shaped and let in through the top of the framing to give the eave a lift.


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Not perfect, but much flatter.


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The "arched" fascia beyond is being clamped to straighten it prior to flitch plate bolting. In the foreground a depression in the midspan of the workshop's 2x6's will be flattened.


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The carpenter likes to reuse 19th century white oak barn beams where infill framing is used.


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Roman numerals visible on a reclaimed barn beam.


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Another barn beam set to form a strong back across the midspan of the workshop 2x6's....the clamping of the arched fascia beam is visible at the long fascia.

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Prior to replacing the sloped roof, I thought it best to get the fireplace chimney top uncapped and repaired to minimize future traffic on a new roof. The original construction had the terra cotta flue liner nearly flush with the top of the masonry as seen here. It appears at some point a 2" extension of the flue liner was added with additional cement wash to increase the slope of the chimney top. The modified bitumen roofing was adhered directly to the base of the projecting flue liner. To address water infiltration issues, and the current code related issue of bituminous roofing in contact with a flue liner, we are extending the flue liner 12" and surrounding it with two courses of 4" CMU which will allow a reglet to be set 4" above the wash for proper termination of the roofing. It will be flashed with copper and the masonry above will be painted a dark color to camouflage it against the surrounding woods.


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Masonry extension in place....a darker color will help.


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With a mason on site, it seemed a good time replace any spalled or cracked CMU's in the low extension walls.


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Roofing stripped in preparation for new underlayment.


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Mock-up of roll and batten roofing.


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Another view of mock-up. The base batten is a section of EdgeVent.

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

"To address water infiltration issues, and the current code related issue of bituminous roofing in contact with a flue liner, we are extending the flue liner 12" and surrounding it with two courses of 4" CMU which will allow a reglet to be set 4" above the wash for proper termination of the roofing. It will be flashed with copper and the masonry above will be painted a dark color to camouflage it against the surrounding woods."

I suggest just running the copper up the 8" of CMU and cladding the top of the chimney with copper. The small paint area will just be a maintenance nuisance. Copper is a wonderful material to work with. We are restoring the exterior of the 1910 Booth Hall by Holabird and Roche and we are doing extensive work with copper. It works great.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

If left unfinished, copper turns black, which would kill two birds.

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Paul and Roderick.
Good tips...thanks.

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The weather has slowed progress with respect to the roof, but work continues.

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Holes cut in the existing carport sheathing to allow air into the rafter spaces via the new edge vents to be installed.


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The new holes gives a window into one of the original flitch plates in the carport roof.


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Roof underlayment is in place: 1/4" DensDeck, self adhering ice and water shield, and roll roofing base sheet.


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A view of the west side of the roof...the black roll roofing base sheet material baking in the sun. Application of the red finish roll roofing has been delayed due to weather: either too wet or too hot. Moisture presents adhering issues, and too hot poses workability issues on a roof where arrow straight and flat application is critical. The underlayment gives us a dry condition for the house and exposure of the base sheet to UV is OK for about 30 days.


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In the mean time, metal work for edge flashing, and preparation of base flashing for built-in gutters is proceeding.


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The gutters will be held back 12" from the corners, and will be custom bent to exactly match the original fascia profile. The edge vent is in place just above the gutter recess...it will look like a batten shadow line when all is finished.


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Installation of insulation is proceeding. Spacer strips were installed to maintain an airspace between the polyisocyanurate boards and the underside of the sheathing.


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Sill sealer roll was stapled to the exposed faces of the rafters to prevent ghosting on the drywall. The gaps in the insulation at the bridging will be filled with foil faced fiberglass batts.


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Christine and her cousin enjoying dinner in what we call the "Cantilever Cafe". As we don't currently have a dining room, and eating in the galley kitchen is difficult for more than two people, this has been a good substitute. (The 2x posts prevent deflection of the carport roof under the weight of roofing installers and equipment.)
Last edited by DRN on Mon Jun 15, 2015 4:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.

SDR
Posts: 20304
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I recall that the drawings show the carport roof supported by two I-beams, installed with webs plumb. Is the south eave flitch plate an original addition to this design, or a substitution ?

SDR

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The Taliesin drawings: "Sheet No. 4 Roof Framing" and "Sheet No. 5 Sections" indicate a flitch at the east eave of the carport.

Sheet No. 5 was posted here:

http://www.savewright.org/wright_chat/v ... 04f15d72ee

The flitch is in the upper left corner of the sheet, possibly it can be zoomed upon.

DavidC
Posts: 8122
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Dan:

Thanks for keeping us up to date on all-things Sweeton. You are doing a wonderful, measured and caring job on your terrific home.

As far as covering the exposed edges on the ceiling studs with the sill sealer to prevent any ghosting on the drywall, are you familiar with Aerogel Insulation by Thermablok? It claims to limit thermal bridging betweern the stud edge and the drywall - and adds a 30% - 42% increased insulation factor, depending on the thickness of material used.

I have no idea on the cost of this item. Could be through the roof (so to speak). But, then again, it could be worth the upfront investment for something that will be covered by drywall for a long, long time - and help with the overall insulation factor.


David

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Thanks for sharing that David, I was not aware of the product. I'll have to read about it, and see how I might use it on future projects. Sweeton's insulation is a "done deal", at least on this phase as all materials are bought and on site.

It looks as if the Aerogel's thickness is a bit greater than the sill sealer strips I'm using...I'll have to experiment and see if that causes alignment issues with the flush transom stops when sandwiched under the 3/8" GWB. I might be able to use it in the future on bedroom 2 and the master bedroom if cost and alignment don't cause a problem.

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The roof is now 99.9% complete. For the first time in about 45 years the roof of the Sweeton house looks as Wright intended. Seeing the roll and batten roof in 3D rather than just a single color photo or some tiny black and white partial snapshots is a revelation for me. The striation of the roof with the battens unifies it with the block coursing of the walls....what was a dull flat plane, albeit cantilevered, sitting atop the masonry, is now truly married to the composition. I love it.

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EdgeVent at the base of the roof with battens milled from Trex decking thereafter. The factory finish of the Trex was left exposed at the edge, and "end grains" painted with roll roofing primer. Because of the low elevation of the workshop roof, and thus the visibility into the gutter, coupled with the presence of the ground gutter, we elected not to gutter this section.


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Built-in gutter custom formed to match the fascia profile. The original fascia wraps the corner and extends 12" inward.


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The gutter spouts work well....I'm considering leaving off the chains for a while until I see how the water behaves. At the house corners there is minimal, if any, splashing of the house; at the drop in the middle of the long front eave where the water is closer to the gallery wall, I will definitely install the chain.

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Bravo!

DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Dan:

The roll/batten-look on the roof really, really adds to the overall horizontality of the entire structure. It marries the roof perfectly with everything underneath - and above!

Congratulations! It just keeps getting better and better as time goes on!


David

dtc
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:04 am

Post by dtc »

As all can see, you are the perfect steward of Sweeton.
Looks great!

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Dan,
This calls for another visit to NJ.

Maybe the FLWBC would be interested in organizing one of their Out and About tours when you are done, if you are interested.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 4058
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Thanks for the kind words.
We'd be happy to have the FLWBC come by again...the house has improved a bit since the 2011 Conference in Philadelphia.

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