Biophilic design.........

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therman7g
Posts: 264
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:14 am
Location: Illinois

Biophilic design.........

Post by therman7g »

Wright got a lot right, but not everything. Wright's work

jackless

Post by jackless »

what a stupid comment. name 1 architect anytime before 1959 that paid any attention to energy conservation or low environmental impact designs.



just another example of a journalist who writes about things they know nothing about.

RJH
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Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Post by RJH »

The author of this article does not know what they are talking about. Wright was working on biophilic design well before it ever became apparent to other architects. To Wright, it was called 'nature."



First of all, Wright orientated most of his houses to face south. This allows sun to stream into the house through windows in the winter, which heats the inside of the house. In the summer, there is a broad roof overhang that shelters the house from the sun since the sun is higher in the sky during that season. I

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Given the world FLW lived in, he was as "biophilic" as he could be. If nothing more forward-thinking than his earth berm houses had become popular, think of all the energy we could have saved over the past half century. Although he used the word "organic" to describe his work, late in life he regretted the choice, and said that if he had it all to do over again, he would use "bionic" ... and that was decades before "The Six Million Dollar Man."

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

Following up on what RJH has said, Joseph Connors, in his book on the Robie house (I think), points out that Wright was doing what we nowadays call passive solar design a hundred years ago. The prairie houses have broad eaves to provide shade in the summer and abundant windows to pick up any available breezes. In the winter, when the midwestern sun is low, the same windows pick up all available sunlight.



Construction costs and operating costs can be a tradeoff, wherein saving on one leads to greater costs on the other. For example, if you skimp on insulation when you build, your heating and air conditioning costs will be higher. A fully self-sufficient solar electricity system (which I don't think our current technology is up to) might be expensive to build, but, if it works and if maintenance is cheaper than a monthly electricity bill, you save. The tradeoffs keep changing, and we shouldn't think they were the same when he was building.



Peter

Richard
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

Not to mention Broadacre City and the Mile High office building. Weren't these projects designed with low environmental impact in mind? Except for some minor fallout from the atomic elevators in Mile High, environmentally sound intentions such as the maximization of green space at the base was a major selling point.
Homeowner

mike
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 7:39 pm
Location: st louis

The term organic architecture when was it first used????

Post by mike »

The term organic architecture when was it first used????



Richard Bock used the term in his autobiography which he wrote in the mid-1940's.
St Louis

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