Seth Peterson Cottage Site Plan

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Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

These plans are great. Many thanks for posting them. Much appreciated.
Question about roof framing if you don't mind. First, the perimeter header at the termination of the eave overhang on the NW side (the NW perimeter header) ... that is supported only at two points, by the two plate flitch beams that run EW (vertical to the page), right? Is this perimeter header built up from staggered pieces and bolted together or something like that?
Second, the eave overhang on the north side, the roof framing members run NS and frame back to one of those plate flitch beams and are cantilevered over and supported by the framed glass wall underneath. If that is correct does it mean then that there are four NS roof framing members supported directly by the column/mullions below and that these four NC framing members reach out to support the perimeter EW header?
Last edited by Tom on Fri Apr 05, 2013 4:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dkottum
Posts: 427
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

Outside in, I have often wondered how those (2 x 12 Douglas Fir?) mullions supporting the roof around the front did not rot at the bottom where they rest on the masonry? We have been there to visit and it looks like they may be original, although the sash was new.

Also, do you think the perforated plywood panels at the top had any structural purpose? This was suggested during our visit but, although perfectly suited to the overall design, I wonder if they needed for strengthening the assembly.

doug k

Matt
Posts: 430
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Post by Matt »

Yes, thanks for posting the plans. One of my fav-buildings. There is a dotted line around the chimney. Is that for removing mass from an earlier change in height...or are you raising the chimney for some drafting issues?

Matt

JohnAdams
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Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:09 pm

Post by JohnAdams »

These are fantastic! Thanks OI.

Education Professor
Posts: 594
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by Education Professor »

There is an outstanding book about the rehabilitation of the Peterson cottage by Wright Chatter outsider in and Kristin Visser:

http://www.amazon.com/Frank-Lloyd-Wrigh ... ohn+eifler

The book provides a nice summary of the cottage's history and a detailed description of the renovation process. It also contains several photos and illustrations. It is one of the best books about a Usonian design on the market and is very reasonably priced. I highly recommend it.

EP

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Never seen the book before. Just ordered it. Thanks.

Education Professor
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by Education Professor »

Good news, Tom. I'm hope enjoy the book!

The Lovness version of Peterson seems a bit larger and taller. dtc, outside in, and others who have experienced both designs, is this accurate? It seems that the Lovness version would have to taller, especially the utility area, to support a stand-up loft.

EP

outside in
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Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

its my understanding that the Loveness cottage is a production of Tom Casey and TAA and (in my opinion) is a little over the top. I much prefer the complex simplicity of the Seth Peterson Cottage.

I wish I could answer the framing questions, but I'm not quite sure what is being asked! I should point out that the steel beam that frames into the chimney (where the sloped roof and flat roof meet) extends beyond the exterior wall and is used to support the cantilevered roof over the terrace.

The framing also shows a pocket that we created for the installation of insulating curtains that would be dropped at night to help conserve heat in the winter. Unfortunately they were never installed.

Education Professor
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by Education Professor »

outside in, thanks for your insights! I apologize for my lack of clarity. As someone with no training or expertise whatsoever in architecture and engineering, I am usually dangerous at best in asking about technical details:)

Would the storage area above the bathroom in the Peterson cottage have been able to support a small loft like the one that is in the Lovness version of the cottage?

EP

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

there is a small storage loft above the bathroom (see plan) that is accessed by a ship's ladder from the utility room behind the kitchen.

Matt
Posts: 430
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Post by Matt »

I didn't know Loveness was done after Wright's death. I had always wondered if there is another example of Wright building the same design to two different clients. Storer doesn't even have the Loveness cottage in his book...I guess he doesn't consider it Wright.

outside in
Posts: 1272
Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

whoops - forgot a drawings

Image

Tom
Posts: 3217
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Yeah, I find it really hard to ask these framing questions in ways that are easy to understand.

How 'bout this: the roof joists that cross over the main window wall are discontinuous at that point, that is the point where they cross over the window wall. That's how I read your sections. Is this correct?

outside in
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Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

Yes, we interrupted them at the line of support and installed headers due to the following:
1. We wanted "pockets" to install electronically controlled recessed roller shades that would drop in the evening for energy efficiency. Unfortunately they were not installed, but may someday.
2. I've often speculated that the perforated panels were designed to also perform as framing supports, i.e. plywood headers, that would provide intermediate support on the roof framing that spanned from the bottom of the slope to the continuous header at the fascia. Wright spanned the Jacobs House and a few others the same way, and we did the same at the sloped portions of the roof. However, due to our desire to install recessed shades we doubled up the rafters at the bearing points and headed off the others.
Last edited by outside in on Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

John:

Thanks for posting all of this wonderful information on Seth Peterson - a fantastic design w/ a great rehab done by you and your firm.

I have a general engineering question: when you have one end of a beam the is let into a masonry structure (in this case, the chimney), how are you attaching the flanges of the beam to the brick or block to assure a solid, unmoving connection is being made for (hopefully) all time?


David

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