Innovative Staircase

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Paul Ringstrom
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Innovative Staircase

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

The February 2013 issue of Builder magazine has an article on pg 26 about a new innovative staircase where the treads on one side are supported by thin stainless steel rods. Wheeler Residence, Scarsdale, NY, Saniee Architects, Greenwich, Conn. Funny, I saw this same stair at the Penfield House (1953). No credit for the originator of the idea from sixty years ago in the article.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

JimM
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Post by JimM »

...... and Mossberg.... Fallingwater.

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Would Fallingwater be the first instance of this type of staircase in Wright's work?
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

...and Annie Pheiffer chapel, not to mention Price Studio and Eugene Bavinger house by Bruce Goff...

I wonder if the image of the Charnley house stair spindles (scroll down to the last 3 or 4 pics):

http://www.peterbeers.net/interests/flw ... _house.htm

..led Wright to take the next step and translate the wood to steel, and then naturally, he would be inclined to use the steel in tension...and then....

Forest
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Post by Forest »

There are two such stairs at the Arizona Biltmore

Image
109-0914_IMG by forest2014, on FlickrImage
The block and rail at the first floor level are more recent additions.

Palli
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Post by Palli »

and Glore, Boulter
The Perf Project

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I've been fond of this spindle screen at the Thomas Gale residence. The spindles do double duty as porch baluster and exclusion screen.


Image

No 16 in the Second Edition of W A Storrer's A Complete Catalog © 1978

Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

That would make the Arizona Biltmore the first?
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Then was it an innovation of Warren McArthur or Wright?

Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Peter,
That, of course, is a good question, but I think you meant Albert not Warren. Warren Sr. was the father and client of Wright. McArthur House (1892) 4852 South Kenwood Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. Warren Jr. was a brother.

from wikipedia:
Albert Chase McArthur (February 2, 1881 – March 1951) worked with architect Frank Lloyd Wright between 1907 and 1909. This practice was a remarkable collection of creative architectural designers. As his son, John Lloyd Wright, says,
“William Drummond, Francis Barry Byrne, Walter Burley Griffin, Albert McArthur, Marion Mahony, Isabel Roberts and George Willis were the draftsmen. Five men, two women. They wore flowing ties, and smocks suitable to the realm. The men wore their hair like Papa, all except Albert, he didn’t have enough hair... I know that each one of them was then making valuable contributions to the pioneering of the modern American architecture for which my father gets the full glory, headaches and recognition today!� [4]

Albert McArthur continued his education in Austria and Italy, opening an architectural firm in Chicago with partner Arthur S. Coffin in 1912. He moved his practice to Phoenix in 1925. The Biltmore is his most important design. In the course of the Great Depression, all three of the McArthur brothers moved to Hollywood, California in 1932. Albert Chase McArthur died in March 1951 in California.[5]

Q: Did Albert Chase McArthur ever design anything else?

A: There are other works by Albert Chase McArthur in the Phoenix area including a residence for M. D. B. Morgan, completed in 1927, and several houses in the Phoenix Country Club area.[5]

Of course then there is Wright's letter to Albert Chase McArthur’s widow, twenty-five years after the Arizona Biltmore’s completion: "I have always given Albert's name as architect ... and always will. But I know better and so should you."


[4] “My Father�, John Lloyd Wright, 1995
[5] Arizona State University Library, special collections biography
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Oops...yes, Albert...

Rood
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Post by Rood »

peterm wrote:Then was it an innovation of ... McArthur or Wright?
Anyone who has seen McArthur's original drawings for the Arizona Biltmore Hotel knows that he didn't have too much to do with the building that was constructed, and that we see today.

dkottum
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Post by dkottum »

Apparently Wright disliked the diagonal line in elevation very early, even Charnley has wood spindles to the ceiling on one side of the staircase.

doug k

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