Hoffman Showroom status

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DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Hoffman Showroom status

Post by DavidC »


Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »


DRN
Posts: 4044
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Some would call this a minor work, but it is definitely a dropped ball. Given the obvious allusion to the Guggenheim, and the dynamics of the space, I'm surprised that even if an auto retailer didn't want a sales only space at that location, that a modern art gallery owner specializing sculpture would not have seen its potential. Location?

I wonder when the Wright designed (cherry? teak?) furniture (brochure tables, hassocks, built-in benches) will start to hit the auction blocks? I assume representatives of M-B removed them as they vacated and will eventually want to profit from them.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Mercedes did not own the building. They leased it from Midwood Properties. I presume that Midwood Properties owned the free-standing and built-in furniture.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 4044
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

I would have thought the furniture (at the very least the moveable pieces) would have been the property of the tenant, as it was the tenant who contracted with Wright for the fit-out of the space originally.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10575
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The problem with preserving commercial property is that it's all about profit. The M/B showroom is/was too specific in its design; to keep it intact would require finding a lessee who could accommodate the ramp. Easier to peddle a blank space so the next tenants can do whatever they want with it. Even Hoffman remodeled the place when he switched from Jaguar to M/B.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

I was always taught that tenant improvements become the property of the Lessor upon termination of the lease.

Someone who is a professional in this field can correct me if this is incorrect.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

jmcnally
Posts: 868
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:23 am

Post by jmcnally »

Typical leases provide that tenant improvements go to the landlord when the lease ends, but that only includes permanent attachments to the property. It would not include furniture, office equipment, display vehicles, or stationery. If it can be moved without damaging the structure, it belongs to the tenant.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 4044
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

A link to a New York Times 2007 remembrance of Max Hoffman:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/18/autom ... .html?_r=0

My apologies if this is a repost.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

more info on what happened behind the scenes...

http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20 ... /130419943
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10575
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Where do they get the idea that Hoffman was the inspiration for Guggenheim? Not only did Morris precede Hoffman by 6 years, the Guggenheim design preceded them both, to say nothing about Gordon Strong.

Macrodex
Posts: 236
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Post by Macrodex »

I recall Scully remarking how Guggenheim could've been inspired by some Corbusier creation I can't recall the name of. I really doubt it; and wonder if he knew of Gordon Strong or Wright's remarks about Corbusier.

Matt
Posts: 430
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Post by Matt »

Demolition permits should have a space to fill in the name of the architect-designer of the work being demolished. Certain names should then send up a red flag so that permits aren't issues in just a day.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Matt wrote:Demolition permits should have a space to fill in the name of the architect-designer of the work being demolished. Certain names should then send up a red flag so that permits aren't issues in just a day.
What a great idea!
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

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