Brandes chairs

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Roderick Grant
Posts: 10537
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Arms are comfortable, but also a design problem ... at least in that case.

As to the Electrolux problem, what's the wrong with a few out-of-sight dust bunnies?

SDR
Posts: 20099
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Heh. You should see my house . . . But for those who are more particular, regular vacuuming is unavoidable. And if it can be done without damaging the furniture, then I'm all for it. The problem is that implements usually mark the woodwork in exactly the same place every time, accelerating the accumulated damage . . .

Chair arms become more important for low seating -- as an aid to getting into and (especially) out of the seat -- as well as for comfort while sitting. With the skirt projecting out below the seat of this chair, one hasn't even the advantage of placing one's feet advantageously for arising.

I tried a horizontal arm on the Brandes chair, but it didn't work out ergonomically. A broader arm than my 3 1/2" would have been useful as a mini-table . . . ?

SDR

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4387
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Peter,
My initial impression of that chair was: Captain Kirk !!
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4387
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

SDR wrote:A broader arm than my 3 1/2" would have been useful as a mini-table . . . ?
To make it appeal to middle America (me) you will have to have a wider arm with a hole in it to hold an adult beverage!
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20099
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Paul, Paul, Paul . . .


Right on both counts. 8)

SDR

peterm
Posts: 6288
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Thomas Lee was a genius!

The Westport Chair, 1905:

http://stashpocket.files.wordpress.com/ ... tchair.jpg

No hole in the arm, but if one would find it difficult to balance a cocktail on that arm, it would certainly be "last call"...

SDR
Posts: 20099
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Heck, with that baby you could line up a six-course meal . . . !


SDR

peterm
Posts: 6288
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Let's see...Potato salad, corn on the cob, fried chicken, watermelon, (maybe some sort of seafood dish for the real east coasters), Long Island iced tea, followed by cherry pie?

I think you're right, that could all fit on those uniquely American sized arms...

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