Archives to Avery Library/ Columbia University

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SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Archives to Avery Library/ Columbia University

Post by SDR »

I don't know enough about microfilm, after reading some of what Wikipedia has on the subject. But it could be assumed that photographic film would provide the highest resolution images possible. Any reproduction other than a photographic print from a negative would contain the beginnings of degradation of the image; printing plates employing Benday dots to create half-tone necessarily provide a compromised image. Scans of printed material could not improve upon the material being scanned; scans of photographic originals or negatives (including those of microfilm ?) would have the potential to provide better resolution than any half-tone reproduction, limited then to the dpi (dots per inch) of the scanner.

S

SDR
Posts: 20087
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Archives to Avery Library/ Columbia University

Post by SDR »

Here's a random sampling of drawings from the first page of the Artstor collection as linked on the previous page. There's some fresh revelation in almost all of them.

Mossberg plan, early version before second-level bedroom---and the dramatic stair---were added:

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Storrer as-built plan. Note that unit changed from 7'-0" to 5'-6":

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An early (?) section drawing of Taliesin West, dated 1937, relating the pitch of the drafting-room roof to the pyramidal exterior stair. Marks at regular intervals on the sloping roof are mysterious:

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View of Lamberson, with surprising wooden garden wall (?) at left. The dramatic dark areas of the drawing serve in part to support my assertion that reds can "read" darker that expected when photographed in black and white. Compare to colored version of the drawing, in Taschen:

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Previously unseen view of the H E Brown project of 1906:

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Previously we had seen the hipped-roof and the concrete-block versions of this house:

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A nice birds-eye view of the Malcolm Willey house in its final form. We've seen a similar drawing, I think, perhaps only on Steve Sikora's site:

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Last is a section drawing of the first Keys scheme, concentrating on roof form and structure. There are several variations of this house in print. CLose-ups of the section drawing show a total of five wide-flange beams, labeled either "porch" or "carport":

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Drawings of Keys 1 in Monograph 7 and Taschen III. The Artstor site has 53 other Keys drawings (split between Schemes 1 and 2). Anyone who can connect the above sections with Scheme 1, variants A or B, has my applause:

Image A

Image A

Image B

Image B

All drawings © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Re: Archives to Avery Library/ Columbia University

Post by peterm »

Image

Image

The drawing of Lamberson is from 1948, before Wright notified the clients that he was dissatisfied with the siting of the house. It was relocated to the next knoll to the northeast, and the “shop” (the board and batten structure which looks like a wall or fence) was eliminated. The newer site was less steep and therefore didn’t require the additional retaining wall/planter on the north end (to the right in the image) of the house, which was also abandoned. The orientation was also shifted by a few degrees.

I think Wright might have anticipated the eventual growth of the adjacent County Hospital. I’m glad he repositioned it.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Archives to Avery Library/ Columbia University

Post by Roderick Grant »

T-West: I would bet the marks on the sloping roof indicate (roughly) the locations of the canvas panels, and show how the grid is adjusted to accommodate the slope of the roof.

HE Brown: Perhaps the client objected to the proto-block version, and FLW redid the house, seemingly also on large blocks or bricks, rather than the plaster version. The real oddity is determining what that pattern in the block version meant.

Keys: Either of the two Keys Projects would make a good virtual study, and would have been better than what was built.

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