Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

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SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

We have seen this interesting house before; it's always nice to have a new set of images.

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... =governors

By the way, the word is "flair," not "flare"---unless we're talking about a fire.

Wrightians are going to have too look more closely at their ubiquitous mention of "compression and release," if their aim is to make a meaningful distinction between his houses on the one hand, and practically any building with a confined entrance area, on the other. At any houses in the world where a small porch at the entry, or a vestibule, are present, these might qualify as the "compression" half of the equation---assuming that the rooms beyond are larger and airier, which they are almost bound to be ?

Perhaps a sharper pencil will be employed, metaphorically, to make clear what it is about Wright's houses and other buildings that make them unique in this regard ?

S
"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

peterm
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by peterm »

Realtor speak:

The house’s “prominent linear lines”...

As for compression and release- What makes Wright’s use of this unique is that he does this not by accident or to save space, but to create a specific sensation. Plan and elevation are both squeezed simultaneously to move us forward, and to intentionally trick us into experiencing the space beyond in an exaggerated way.

I can’t think of an extremely small Wright designed space that is also tall. American tract houses have narrow hallways which are often the same height as the living room. Wright would avoid that. The exception might be some Usonian workspaces made tall to allow cooking odors and heat to rise. He also understood that the inhabitant is typically standing while preparing meals.

Paul Ringstrom
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20187
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

FLW-inspired IMHO by the Price House

https://www.azfamily.com/lifestyle/phoe ... =997196#48
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20187
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Certainly. Details like the sheer roof fascia and the frameless strip window glazing show this to be a serious architectural exercise. A decorator intrusion, diagonal tile inserts in a shower wall that could have been the interior extension of a long garden surface, is unfortunate.

S
"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

inspired by Seth Peterson Cottage in St. Donatus, IA
available on airbnb.

https://www.bellevueheraldleader.com/ne ... ae581.html

photos: https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/47842966?a ... F&guests=1
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Once again we learn something about Mr Wright's superior handling of tricky detailing issues, by comparing his solutions to those of lesser designers. In the case of Mr O'Donnell's striking and well-constructed version of Seth Peterson, the detail at the glazed corner, where a horizontal run of sash on one elevation meets a similar but pitched run, presents an example. The conventional means of handling that transition, employed routinely by architects and builders, is to level the pitched run before it arrives at the corner, so that the return is a simple miter. This is what our builder has chosen to do. But you wouldn't catch Wright in that trap, if his eye demanded a simpler-looking transition and a solution could be found.

He might couch the matter in terms of "continuity" or some such, to satisfy the curious and impressionable journalist, but it's just a matter of having the wit and care to streamline his work and to avoid a distracting visual hiccup. I don't find a detail drawing of his building that clearly defines his solution, but the evidence is clear in photographs: he simply tilts the corresponding horizontal mullion so that the miter is accomplished directly. Compare the exterior and interior views of the Peterson and Lovness cottages with those of the new building:


Image

Image

Image
Photo Thomas Heinz

Image
Photo Peter Maunu

Image

Image
Photo of the Lovness cottage, Yukio Futagawa


Despite the fancy that his roof is carried only by the glass, Mr O'Donnell's framing is robust and unavoidable. A look at the bedroom corner can be compared to the somewhat more subtle framing that Wright employs there:

Image

Image
Photo Serrano


Nevertheless, Mr O'Donnell's building has charm aplenty; the stonework is lovely, the stone floor a delight, and the quality of construction is self-evident.

S
"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Roderick Grant
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Roderick Grant »

The only incontestably FLW-inspired element in that house is the glorious chandelier in the dining room.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Hmm. And with April fools months away . . .?

S
"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

designed by an unlicensed U-M architecture student

https://www.freep.com/story/money/real- ... 374757001/
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4400
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

apprentice-designed home $1.1M Clearwater, FL
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandho ... 2541-68408
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10569
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Roderick Grant »

This is a very handsome house, more reminiscent of Alfred Browning Parker than FLW.
Love the Haywood Wakefield dining chairs.

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