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Posted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 9:12 am
by DavidC

Posted: Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:36 pm
by DavidC

Posted: Sun Mar 24, 2019 8:30 pm
by SDR
. . . sigh . . .

:evil:

S

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:28 am
by Roderick Grant
Now here we have an "OMG" "Bizarre" situation.

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:19 pm
by SDR
Perhaps the table is actually marked "Henredon". . . leading the hopeful and ignorant or dishonest seller to assume a Wright connection ?

S

Wright-inspired house

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:20 pm
by John
Of course Wright would always include five (5) garages!!!!!

Re: Wright-inspired house

Posted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 6:05 pm
by Rood
John wrote:Of course Wright would always include five (5) garages!!!!!
Not always, not very often, but at least once. The expansive House on the Mesa, designed in 1931 for an "... ideal American family who might be able to do such a thing as an example to the country ... " included a large motor court flanked by a five-car garage, with quarters at one end for a chauffeur.

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:28 am
by Roderick Grant
Wingspread has 5 stalls.

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:33 pm
by SDR
Gillin has only four. Cheapskate . . .

S

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:39 pm
by Reidy
According to TripAdvisor, Fallingwater has room for four.

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 8:22 pm
by Paul Ringstrom

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 9:30 pm
by SDR

Posted: Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:32 am
by Roderick Grant
Edward Humrich proves you don't need to be trained to be a fine architect.

The first Riverwoods house is excellent, if a bit too white. Is the treatment of the living room roof structure an original piece of work, or was there a structural failure that caused those sistered beams to be added? Whatever, it works.

The second Riverwoods house is even better, but the interior décor seems at odds with the cabin-like structure. Too suburban.

The Olympia Fields house is most FLW-like. The view of the hallway with the rafters on display is reminiscent of FLW's Albert Adelman House, of which there is such a view in the '56 HB that Humrich undoubtedly saw.

Posted: Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:41 am
by outside in
We've worked on a couple of Humrich's houses in Riverwoods, they're really quite nice. I too thought he was "untrained", but I recently discovered that he had worked for another architect Robert Seyfarth, who designed homes throughout the north shore of chicago. Seyfarth, in turn, worked for George Maher. It all seems so connected somehow.

Posted: Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:44 am
by SDR
I see as well a hint of Schweikher in these houses---some of them, anyway.

These Chicago-area designers as a group (Edward Dart is another) seem to have blended east-coast post-and-beam rationalism with west-coast warmth; perhaps proximity to Wright is a common denominator ?

S