Fran Lloyd Wright's hemicycle designs

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Unbrook
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Post by Unbrook »

Thank you for the information. You've given me a reason to need to go to DC again!

JPB_1971
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Post by JPB_1971 »

Does anyone know what the function of the exposed I-beams shown in one of the pictures of the article on the Lewis house is? Is this perhaps where the carport used to be before disintegrating and thus exposing the steel?

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Or a partially completed carport...?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Image

The Lewis plan, ©W A Storrer

Craig
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Post by Craig »

The Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation has a pamphlet on the Lewis House. On the left side of the page there's a pdf entitled, "SpringHouse". There are some vintage photos showing the still standing carport as well as many photos revealing the sad, sad state of affairs today. According to their January 2012 newsletter, Clifton Lewis is still living in her house.

http://www.taltrust.org/research-center
ch

Jeff Myers
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Post by Jeff Myers »

It looks so sad inside. I wonder what will happen to it down the road.... I hope someone comes in and restores this home to the former glory it once had. Sad to it in that state.
JAT
Jeff T

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Entropy

Unbrook
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Post by Unbrook »

But the genius of Mr. Wright shows through!

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Absolutely... Left unrestored it will eventually decay and have the same presence as something like the Pauson house. Even architectural ruins reveal their beauty...

The good news is that it can always be restored. This is right up there with Outside In's Ross house, and look at how that is coming along!

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Okay. So the remaining question is . . .

Who is Fran Lloyd Wright ?

:)

Laurie Virr
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Post by Laurie Virr »

To be perfectly frank, it was a typographic error on my part.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Posters may not be aware that each contributor is able to edit his own postings, including the initial message and its title . . .


S

juankbedoya
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Re:

Post by juankbedoya »

SDR wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:05 am
Here are Mr Wright's eleven constructed hemicycle plans, as ordered (and numbered) by William A Storrer, whose plans I take the liberty
of sharing with readers here.

I apologize for the quality of some scans. The drawings are not too badly out of scale with each other -- a rough science in my hands as yet.


Very interesting.. thanks for posting all hemicycle designs, built or not... but I have some questions
* Can we consider the Winn or Marden houses like a hemicycle? I see only squares with a curved glass facade
* The hemicycle is a half cycle of the sun right? but in this "type"of usonian houses there are some eye-shaped houses like Lewis or Llewelyn, so the building is not following the sun, so... is this more a matter of form rather than a true functioning "hemicycle"?
*If the eye-shaped house is a hemicycle... Should I suppose the Pottery house must be in the list?
*if a project like Hargrove and others are in the list... What about the Lykes house..?

To be honest I think a lot of this houses and projects are more a matter of curved form rather than working with the sun with the hemicycle.

SDR
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Re: Fran Lloyd Wright's hemicycle designs

Post by SDR »

I agree---of course. For me, Wright was first and foremost a form-maker, with a publicist's flair for justification-after-the-fact. But it would be unfair to lump the various lenticular houses that followed, with Jacobs II, a sincere attempt to make the most of the site and the sun. See this recent thread:

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... le#p106515

And don't take the word hemicycle too seriously; Mr Wright clearly didn't believe it had to denote a full half-circle---in every case. Indeed, a building that occupied a full 180 degrees of ground would block it own access to direct sunlight, at the beginning and at the end of the day ?

S

KevinW
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Re: Fran Lloyd Wright's hemicycle designs

Post by KevinW »

Correct. Marden is not a hemicycle. The curved patio gives the illusion in plan.
KevinW

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