House on the Mesa

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Tom
Posts: 3209
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: House on the Mesa

Post by Tom »

I get it RG. Funny to compare it to my thinking them being SO classy those many decades ago.
but .... shutters. I do like shutters
yet man are they expensive

SDR
Posts: 19617
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: House on the Mesa

Post by SDR »

Modernists of a certain stripe might be fans of vertical blinds, especially if they were acquainted with the inventor of the pioneering brand, Thru-Vu. Visitors to the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the 'fifties would have encountered these blinds at the West 53rd Street entrance to the museum. The reinforced-fabric blades or vanes are connected at the bottom with light-weight ball chain.

The inventor was Henry Wright (no relation to Frank), who lived next door to Ezra Stoller on North Kirby Lane in Rye, in a house he designed. (Stoller's house was self-designed in company with ex-Breuer architect Abe Geller.) Wright co-authored, with George Nelson, "Tomorrow's House" (1945). Here is his obituary:

https://www.nytimes.com/1986/10/06/obit ... cture.html

Henry Wright's house, looking very much as it did in the 'fifties. The Stoller house is slightly visible further up the hill (left), on the same side of the street.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/6+Kir ... 73.6701075

S

Tom
Posts: 3209
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: House on the Mesa

Post by Tom »

Wow, interesting life.
Thanks for the post.

g.dorn
Posts: 236
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 12:59 am
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Contact:

Re: House on the Mesa

Post by g.dorn »

What struck me when I first saw the drawings and model of this house ( lat 80's), is how courtyard typology its layout was.

I have subsequently been acquainted with the work of John Gaw Meem, who developed the "pueblo revival style" in Sante Fe in the late 20's, with a strong reflection of the courtyard hacienda prototype - which to me is what Mr Wright was exploring in this Mesa House - and which later became his benchmark for the early usonians.

Image
image from "Facing Southwest the life and houses of John Gaw Meem 2001
G Dorn
Perth Western Australia
www.dornworks.com
think, design, build

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10300
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: House on the Mesa

Post by Roderick Grant »

FLW's first true courtyard design to be constructed was Barnsdall. The Garden Court was intended as a summertime living room. Hardy has two courtyards, though the house is not wrapped around them. There are courtyards at Taliesin, of course, but they started out as functional vehicular spaces rather than outdoor living areas. One of the unfortunate projects never to have been built is his own Studio-Residence at Fiesole. Then there are his various residences in Arizona: An adobe project (1924) with a small cluster of rooms attached to an octagonal walled court, possibly for Death Valley; Ocotilla (1928); and Sun Trap (1937) the original structure that was eventually absorbed into T-West as Iovanna's apartment, originally a court with minimal enclosures.

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