Help w/ plans

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

To my mind, the asymmetrical decorative textile "set dressing" -- there's another in the Tahoe barge drawing just above -- represents the human use of the architectural object. Such use is by nature random, or at least asymmetrical, in contrast to the structural vessel in many cases. The off-center and directional chimney mass in the otherwise axial Storer volume is another example.

How do we know that "Wright added the little girl" to the Guggenhiem drawing, Jim ? It all looks to be in the same hand, doesn't it ? Congratulations on the image-posting -- we can expect a feast in the coming months and years, I'm thinking . . .

S D R

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The difference between the two Gladney schemes Jim presents on the previous page is interesting: Most of the house remains the same, with only the roof and the central structure that supports it altered, while most of the other visible elements seem identical. Yet those parts that are different are completely different . . .

S

Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

TnGuy wrote:The exterior woodwork on Gladney seems to be a very close cousin in design to son Lloyd Wright's Taggart House (which pre-dates it by two years).
Interesting that you say that... I thought the same thing. I like Taggart a lot. Hope to see it some day.

Has anyone on the Chat Board been inside Taggart since the restoration?

Jeff Myers
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Post by Jeff Myers »

That is the same one I have Jim of the Dormitory. It seems like the fascia wasn't finished on the drawing,taking the thought that I guess that nothing much was done with this project. It has similarities to Johnson Wax and Wingspread by the materials chosen.
JAT
Jeff T

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

Thanks for all the info/plans. There was one building I just remembered I was looking for a larger image of/more info, and it came to me when I was browsing through a folder. I don't remember the name of the project, but, I found it when looking for Masieri Memorial pictures.

Image

SDR
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Post by SDR »

It would be helpful to see that image reproduced with more contrast -- and/or at a larger size. I see what appear to be unequal-pitch roofs -- but I'm not sure even of the intended function of this design. Is it a house ?


SDR

dkottum
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Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

Macrodex, that last house scheme was for Dr. B. Marden Black in Rochester, Minnesota, and was not built. I don't have any references with me but it was designed about 1947 along with houses for Bulbulian and Keyes for neighboring lots on Skyline Drive. It is in the Monographs and the recently released publication of Wright's plans.

Doug K

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Macrodex, the drawing appears to be of the Dr. B. Marden Black Project for Rochester, MN, 1947, Mono 7, pp 144-5 and Taschen 116-7.

SDR, the plan for Gladney 2, which appears in Taschen (135-6), is completely different from #1.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Roderick, I was speaking of the two versions of Scheme 1 which Jim posted on the previous page.

Paul Ringstrom provides an enhanced version of the Marden Black (?) imaged posted by Macrodex:


Image

Interesting; a rare four-story house. Perhaps there was a remarkable view to be had -- or (despite the appearance of the perspective sketch) a limited lot size ?

S

dkottum
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Post by dkottum »

A remarkable view indeed at the time for these Rochester, MN houses, southerly high over farmland and wooded hills in the distance, but only minutes from Mayo Clinic where the doctor worked. Today there is a large indoor shopping mall, parking lot, and busy roadways below.

Doug K

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

Thanks for the higher contrast plan, SDR, as well as everyone who helped contribute.

http://photofiles.lib.uchicago.edu/db.x ... oyd+wright

Not sure how prevalent these are, but, here are some pics of the phases of Robie house construction -- one of them, I believe, has a picture of the Robies with child on site.

ozwrightfan
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Location: Sydney Australia

Post by ozwrightfan »

I've never seen so many construction photos before, they are great. Even the book on the Robie house only has a few of these.

JimM
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Post by JimM »

SDR, I can't recall about the little girl, but I know it was an apprentice who was there. I paged through Tafel and Besinger, but might have missed it. I'll try to find it.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The plans are hard to read, but it looks like Black was a refinement (and change of materials) of the Ayn Rand Project of the previous year, although the room with a table attached to the fireplace is not a balcony overlooking the room with the piano, as in Rand. Black is a far superior version.

Wrighter
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Post by Wrighter »

Re: the little girl in the Guggenheim. On page 26 of volume 3 of the taschen monographs, BBP writes that the little girl was already in the drawing, and Wright's addition was the yo-yo that she's playing with.

He reports Wright as saying, "Boys, in all this endeavor we must ever lose sight of a sense of humor."

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