Clark/Prairie House(s)

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Macrodex
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Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Clark/Prairie House(s)

Post by Macrodex »

I was wondering if there are plans for this house
(House for Mr. Clark, Peoria (Detail.)Plate XXXIX) , as I've only ever seen this image of the house, so, I'm not sure if it's unbuilt or just a publication.

I was also wondering if there are any publications with any of the Prairie houses' framing plans.

Thanks.

Image

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

We haven't looked at this house before, I think. Here's the plan from the same source, Wasmuth Plate 39:


Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Hitchcock dates this unbuilt Peoria design at 1904; Mr Robert D Clarke [sic] instead purchased the Francis W Little house and stable in Peoria in 1905, and had Wright design additions to the Little house "and garage" in 1909 -- again according to Hitchcock.

No fewer than three fireplaces are visible from the entry to the living room -- or perhaps that's a niche on the way to the dining room ? -- with another in the kitchen (presumably the seat of a major stove). Stairs are everywhere, including a mysterious pair in the far corners of the living room, perhaps leading down to a terrace-level space. (Auf is up and ab is down, I believe. Ready, set . . . go !)

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Mono 2, pp 115-121. Although it appears in the perspective to be a plaster house, Clark was to have been brick. The central block has bed rooms on top; living room at the main level, half a flight above ground; what is probably a game or billiard room below that (accessed by the sneak stair in the corner of the living room); and a cellar below grade. Over the dining room is a large covered porch, much like the similar Ullman Project (M2, 124-5). The Mono plans are quite different from the Ausge plan, suggesting FLW wanted to edit the scheme, as he did (extensively) to the built William Martin House.

Clark includes a drawing for the famous print stand (fig 213), which first appears at Dana. This is, in my opinion, Wright's most handsome piece of furniture.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

SDR, the fireplace-like element near the dining room is just a niche. What appears to be a fireplace in the kitchen is, on earlier drawings, the usual accommodation for a cook stove. There are fireplaces in the lower level game room and in the master bedroom over the kitchen. The living room pool in the shape of an extended hexagon does not appear in the earlier drawings, but seems to be a conceit of Ausge.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Ah -- I was reading that pool as a fireplace !

A section drawing would be helpful. I had assumed that the dining room at the top of the plan was another half-flight up from the living room, preserving the climb sequence from grade up to the living room. However, the small stair to the right of the dining room flight goes up and turns left; thus, the dining stairs have to go down. Do I have that right ?

Stephen

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

There are sections in the Mono. The dining room is lower than the living room by half a flight. Refer to the Ullman project for a similar arrangement.

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