Recommendations for a good source for Wright furniture?

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lang
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:19 am

Recommendations for a good source for Wright furniture?

Post by lang »

I wanted to ask for opinions from those on the board. Are there any good books that feature details of Wright furniture? A quick search has revealed two books by Tomas Heinz: FLW Furniture Portfolio and FLW Interiors and Furniture. The former is fairly affordable while the latter is more expensive. I am searching for good photos and descriptions of the Usonian period furniture in particular. Are these books good sources? Are there others that i should consider? Any advice would be welcome.

Langdon

Michael Shuck
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FLW furniture

Post by Michael Shuck »

Copeland furniture is the best bet for barrel chairs. They are exquisitely well-made. I have two. The quality is top notch. Copeland is a licensed manufacturer of FLW materials. My Prairie settle came from Stickley. The quality of craftsmanship is outstanding.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

With the hundreds of books that have been written on Frank Lloyd Wright, it would seem logical that there would be at least one definitive book chronicling the Usonian period furniture. Of course, to write this would be a huge undertaking, since almost every house has slightly different variations on some basic themes.

There have been a few interesting threads, for example showing chairs throughout Wright's career, posted here on Wright Chat.

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewt ... ht=origami

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewt ... =furniture

http://savewright.org/wright_chat/viewt ... ght=chairs

pharding
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Post by pharding »

Frank Lloyd Wright Interiors & Furniture by Thomas A. Heinz is the finest book on FLW Furniture.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

lang
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:19 am

Post by lang »

Thanks, peterm, pharding and Micheal. The barrel chairs are favorites of mine. Also thanks for the threads, i am getting better at searching the forum but still frequently come up with seemingly every thread posted on the board or nothing at all. Langdon

pharding
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Post by pharding »

The Copeland Barrel Chairs are superb. The Design within Reach FLW Greene Sofa and FLW Recliners are spectacular. The proportions, design, scale, workmanship are perfect as FLW had them designed. I have all 3 pieces and they are awesome. Unfortunately the DWR FLW pieces were just discontinued.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Deke
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Post by Deke »

What I would like is a book about making Wright furniture. Some of the Usonian designs are very simple and would be easy for the home woodworker to make. Just need those measured drawings.

Deke

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Deke wrote:Just need those measured drawings.
And that appears to be the rub. The Foundation apparently has never had any interest in putting out any type of "Build-it-Yourself" books related to Wright.


David

Deke
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Post by Deke »

Would you really need the foundation's permission? I don't think furniture designs were protected by copyright back them, hence all the knock-offs of Eames designs.

Deke

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

If you wanted any type of Wright association within the book you would need the Foundation's blessing. If, for example, you wanted to do a book of "Usonian Furniture" - the Foundation would have to grant permission, sign off on it and, presumably, get their cut. But rather than allowing this type of thing, they have a history of keeping a very tight and lawyerly reign on as many things Wright-associated as they are able to.

So, in the end, a "Usonian Furniture" book could be published - just without using the word "Usonian", or "Wright', etc. And at that point, where does that leave you - and the buying public?

There was a fellow who, about 10 years or so ago, put out a wookworking pamphlet for a piece he called a "Mile High Usonian Lamp". If I'm not mistaken, the publishing company was contacted and ended up having to yank them.


David

SDR
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Post by SDR »

There was a perhaps unintentional drift in emphasis within the last four posts. It would be possible to publish measured drawings to aid the home-builder, without involving the Foundation -- the designs could be identified by their generic origin (pre-war or post-war American design) and by the name of Wright's client, if desired -- all without mentioning the name of the architect. As has been mentioned many times, no one owns a copyright on the designs themselves.

A number of representative furniture drawings have been published, in the Monographs, to name one source. This furniture sheet from the Goetsch-Winckler project (I use that word for both built and unbuilt commissions) has been presented more than once on Wright Chat. I show here the full sheet and two detail edits. The dimensions of two chairs are sufficient to build them, I believe -- these are two of the most common of Usonian chair designs.

(I would not build the dining chair with a seat parallel to the floor, as drawn: it could not possibly be as comfortable as one with a seat tilted 2 or 3 degrees, as some others of Wright's are. Wright disparaged in writing the very act of sitting; why should we expect a thorough exploration of chair ergonomics, or even consistent common sense, from him ?)


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lang
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Post by lang »

"But rather than allowing this type of thing, they have a history of keeping a very tight and lawyerly reign on as many things Wright-associated as they are able to."

Understandable, I suppose but truly sad. I would really enjoy a Wright furniture DIY book. Keeping an iron grip on all things Wright protects the artists legacy, but what happens to that legacy when no one plays with Wrights ideas? Langdon

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I believe that a helpful and effective illustrated compilation of Usonian furniture, with measurements, could be achieved without the help of the "home office." A number of furniture pieces have been published along with their measurements, by auction houses, museums, and private collections -- in addition to the drawings that have been published in books like the Monographs and the several volumes devoted to individual Usonian residences.

It is possible to deduce a complete set of dimensions from photos in which the overall measurements are known. This is done most easily when the photos are taken with the object's planes nearly or perfectly aligned with the viewing axis -- but I have no doubt that there is software that can derive such measurements from almost any perspective.

S D R

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