Ross House Construction Photos

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outside in
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Post by outside in »

The photograph was taken in late September, just after the completion of the final coat of stucco. We were lucky enough to find the original stucco on the inside walls of the porch, so matching was pretty simple. The original stucco used a lath system that was new to the market (see below). The top coat was SPRAYED on, which I didn't know was possible in 1915, but the machine was called a Goldblatt stucco sprayer. Its similar to that used for dryvit.
Image

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Aha. That material is visible inside my 1928 apartment building, through a gap between the elevator cab and an interior wall.

Can you identify the house in the advertisement ?

SDR

outside in
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Post by outside in »

its the Kissam House, my neighbor to the South.

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The finished house looks great, kudos.

The magazine ad for the period stucco system is quite a find...had you discovered the ad prior to diving into your project, or did it give a name to what you found when the wall was opened? Were there any modern methods or materials you incorporated to the stucco with an eye toward longevity?

outside in
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Post by outside in »

The Ad was discovered by the Glencoe Historical Society when researching the Ravine Bluffs Subdivision in preparation for the centennial celebration/tour this past September.

The gray base and scratch coat were fine - we simply added a top coat per the original.

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Congratulations, John!

It's certainly come a long, long way since the removal of the 'Purple Carbuncle' way-back-when. The house looks outstanding. I'm sure your glad to have all of the work on it behind you now.

I'm not remembering, though - did you add any heating to the porch area?


David

outside in
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Post by outside in »

thanks David,

yes, we ran supply and return air ducts in the crawl space under the porch - its actually the most comfortable room in the house!

Paul Ringstrom
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Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Great job, John.

I had the chance to meet the new owners of the Mary Adams House and get a tour. Wow! You did a great job on that one too! The owners furnished it perfectly.

How is the Winn House coming along?
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Patryko
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Post by Patryko »

STUNNING, ABSOLUTELY STUNNING JOHN!!! I celebrate every time I go by. You have made the Ravine Bluffs subdivision complete and have finished the most unique house of the Ravine Bluffs lot--based on a rectangular plan rather than square.

Thanks for the kind comments Paul Ringstrom. You and your wife are a class act and thanks for your contributions to the world of architecture.

outside in
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Post by outside in »

Finally - the deck is done - now its time for a break



Image
Image

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Ross looks wonderful, John!

Congratulations! Now, kick your feet up, sit back and celebrate!


David

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

Wow. It looks really good. Well done.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Wow. We've been waiting for the disappearance of that old deck !

Let the word go forth: It's perfectly kosher to "originate" on a secondary elevation, and in the interiors, of early Wright properties. Very pleasant results, here. . .

Tell us about the openings on this facade, John. I take it you restored the windows on the second level to their original locations ?

I do love the chocolate-and-vanilla tones you bring to these wood-trimmed stucco houses. Yours is a special take on the foursquare type -- in miniature -- would you say ? One thinks of Kevin's Bob Beharka residence, from the Usonian period, as a volumetric companion . . .

Is the Ross house similar in size to the Fireproof House ? According to Storrer's scaled plans, Ross measures c. 26' x 30' outside; Hunt is 29' square; Stockman is 32' square. Evans, which Storrer includes in the Fireproof group, measures 34' x 38' corner to corner, exclusive of projecting bays. Edmund Brigham, ditto, is a few feet larger yet -- a rectangle, not a square, just as at little Ross.

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I notice a floor lamp in the "porch." Is it now a year-around, heated enclosure? If so, where do you retreat when you want to be outside, but without being eaten by gnats? I wouldn't live in that corner of the world without a screened porch.

outside in
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Post by outside in »

I think I need to clear a few things up - we worked very hard to match the color of the original stucco - I've found that Wright used colors that were generally more intense than the colors most people use to paint the stucco. The stucco is applied with an integral color, allowing it to "breath" and not trap moisture - unfortunately I was unable to include the mica chips which were originally used to make the finish have a slight sparkle.

The wood color is slightly different, in that the Cabots originally used was an opaque stain, whereas we used a combination of light/dark oak Sikkens to show some of the wood grain. The Red Cypress naturally gives slight red tone, which is quite nice.

The original porch has been fitted with bifold windows which can open up completely. I am in the process of making large screens which will cover the openings, allowing the room to be open in the summer without being eaten alive!

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