Baten Boards-Usonaian

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goffmachine
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 5:15 am

Baten Boards-Usonaian

Post by goffmachine »

Can somebody please post some Baten board details? (and the houses they correspond to?)
I have no resources...
Thanks a million.

lang
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:19 am

Post by lang »

:) simply scroll down the page! "request aid completing survey of Usonian perforated boards" is an excellent thread regarding that topic.

Palli Davis Holubar
Posts: 1036
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 8:14 am
Location: Wakeman, Ohio

Post by Palli Davis Holubar »

Here's a description but Lang is right, see page 10 of that thread-
Board and Batten walls: interior and exterior walls consisting of ¾� plywood covered on both sides by a building paper (I forget what Wright specifically suggested), tar paper or roofing felt, ¾ “wooden boards of different width joined together. Inside walls in an early Usonian are the same as the exterior walls.
Then the outer layers on both sides are added from bottom up by joining a wide board with edges cut into a groove with a thinner width batten board with edges cut into a tongue- tongue and groove joinery- with the layers joined with screws. The batten board can be recessed or raised. In the early Usonians, where B&B walls are most common, the walls span the distance between the masonry masses. The sections of wall are inserted into a metal toucan (spelling?) strip that is attached to the slab floor.
The resulting wall is weak and long expanses of wall, notably galleries, are buttressed by linear rows of shelves that prevent buckling. B&B walls emphasize the bold horizontality.
B&B walls were meant to be built in sections on sawhorses and then installed but I suspect that wasn't the normal process.

DavidC
Posts: 8122
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Here are some pictures (w/ close-ups) of a mock-up of the Usonian board-and-batten system - specifically the one used at Pope. I was told when we took the behind-the-scenes Tech Tour that the mock-up was built for Pope when it became a museum - by the same contractor who did the original work on the home.

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David

SDR
Posts: 20292
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Here's the "horse's mouth" evidence (the other half of the coin so beautifully illustrated above): The Standard Detail Sheet intended to accompany the drawings for a Usonian:


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Laurie Virr
Posts: 472
Joined: Sat Jul 25, 2009 5:32 pm

Post by Laurie Virr »

It is important to note the following characteristics of the board and batten wall.

The grooves in both the boards and battens are deeper than the lengths of the tongues.

This is to allow for movement in the wood.

Only the battens are fastened to the plywood with screws, allowing the wider boards to move with changes in temperature and humidity.


Screws cannot be longer than 25 mm [1�] - for obvious reasons.

Screws cannot be back to back on both sides of the wall.

I continue to use internal walls of board and batten when the my client's budgets allow it, but such construction is becoming sufficiently expensive for it to be prohibitive for most.

My apologies if I am preaching to the converted.

wjsaia
Posts: 233
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Post by wjsaia »

The above-posted "standard" details "for Usonian Type Houses" (thank you, SDR) were incorporated quite faithfully into the working drawings for the Hanna house, albeit modified as necessary to reflect its hexagonal plan unit, sloping roofs, etc.

Also, an interesting variation is that the Hanna house board-and-batten walls do not have plywood cores. They are constructed with STUDS(!), just the way real houses are. Well, not actually; the Hanna house's walls have 7/8" x 8" studs spaced 2' - 2" on centers. Mind you I am not referring to my personal copy of the 1934 Uniform Building Code right now, so I'm only guessing that the local building official insisted that wood framed walls had to be constructed with studs each of a cross-sectional area at least equivalent to that of a nominal 2 x 4.

Incidentally, the 7/8" x 8" studs are shown on the drawings to be finger-jointed at the various angled corners. It's a nice touch, but I don't know from personal observation if that particular detail was in fact followed; I doubt it was.

WJS

Education Professor
Posts: 594
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by Education Professor »

I believe that John Sergeant's book about the Usonians discusses the board and batten system in some detail..........

Palli, SDR, Laurie, and wjsaia.......thanks for your insightful and helpful comments about board and batten system. Thanks also to TnGuy for the mock-up photos.

Laurie, when the budget allows, do you prefer to use a specific type of wood for the board and batten? I believe the Shavins used tidewater cypress (and brass screws) exclusively throughout their home....the screws had to be purchased from a marine supplier......

wjsaia
Posts: 233
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Post by wjsaia »

I don't know anything that would have been so special about the screws that they would not have been readily available from regular suppliers . . . (?)

They were to be flat head brass wood screws with slotted heads, countersunk flush, tightened, and left with slots running HORIZONTALLY!

WJS

Laurie Virr
Posts: 472
Joined: Sat Jul 25, 2009 5:32 pm

Post by Laurie Virr »

E.P.

Tidewater Red Cypress trees are rather thin on the ground in this part of the world, as are brass screws, altho I continue to use the latter.

Many years ago, I used Ramin, a Malaysian and Indonesian hardwood for board and batten walls. Being a rainforest timber, it quite rightly became a prohibited import.

Since that time I have, on occasion, used Australian Beech, another hardwood.

Currently I am using Hoop Pine, a timber from Northern New South Wales and Queensland. It mills beautifully.

Brass architectural hardware is totally out of fashion here at this time, altho piano hinge is available from ship’s chandlers. Such imports as are available, are of generally poor quality, and it is necessary to search long and hard, around the world, for acceptable fittings. Sometimes it is necessary to have items custom made.

I use 25 mm long screws, driven and finished as described by wjsaia.

dtc
Posts: 739
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:04 am

Post by dtc »

The Gregor Affleck house has round headed screws tighten to the surface, with no countersinking.
The house has been completly sanded, to clean wood, twice to my knowledge since the mid 90's for the preparation of Sikkens. How about that for additional work...remove screws, sand wood replace screws.

The John Dobkins house has counter sunk steel screws with cut wooden plugs.
The time and effort was worth the final look.

Education Professor
Posts: 594
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by Education Professor »

wjsaia....I believe the Shavins used screws from the marine supplier because they were more readily available at that time due to the very busy river port in Chattanooga (that's the story I recall from Mrs. Shavin anyway)..........

Laurie, is hoop pine similar to our western cedar?

dtc......the cut wooden plugs are a very nice detail.....another example of the excellent craftsmanship throughout Dobkins.....

On a related note, I remember reading an amusing story about Mrs. Rosenbaum being afraid that her adventurous sons would take their Alabama usonian apart one screw at a time.

goffmachine
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 5:15 am

Thank you

Post by goffmachine »

Great Info Everyone.
Thanks again.
Would the exterior of the pew and pauson also be considered B and B?
So much wider. or is it?

DavidC
Posts: 8122
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Re: Thank you

Post by DavidC »

goffmachine wrote:Would the exterior of the pew and pauson also be considered B and B?
The wood used on the exteriors of Pew and Pauson would be more along the lines of a 'lap siding', as opposed to board-and-batten.


David

goffmachine
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 5:15 am

Oh....Lap Siding...

Post by goffmachine »

Oh.
Lap Siding.
I definately am looking for that.
I see it also on the lloyd lewis house as well as pew etc.
Where can I find the detail?
The section?
please help.
Please forgive me beeing so green about this.
I have a love affaire with architecture but am not married to it.
:P

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