Usonian Exhibition house

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dkottum
Posts: 424
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Fireplaces at center of plan

Post by dkottum »

rgrant, was it FLLW who said if you tip the U.S. on its side, everything loose will fall into California? And has. Why not buy a little place on the lake here and spend the winters touring the south with the money you have left over?



Another interesting point about the placement of Wright's fireplaces is how he used it in place of interior partitions to define space. Very early on, Davenport for example, and throughout his career, like Zimmerman, the fireplace is positioned not only in the living room, but also set back somewhat to the dining area. It defines the entry, living, and dining spaces, and hides the kitchen with almost no interior walls. An extreme example is Wingspread where five fireplaces in a masonry core define five living spaces, again without interior partitions. Amazing to me.



Doug Kottum, Battle Lake, MN

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